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type

 [tīp]
the general or prevailing character of any particular case, such as of a disease, person, or substance.
type A a behavior pattern characterized by excessive competitiveness and aggressiveness. See type A behavior.
asthenic type a constitutional type marked by a slender body, long neck, long, flat chest and abdomen, and poor muscular development.
athletic type a constitutional type marked by broad shoulders, deep chest, flat abdomen, thick neck, and good muscular development.
blood type
2. the phenotype of an individual with respect to a blood group system.
body type (constitutional type) a constellation of traits related to body build.
phage type a subgroup of a bacterial species susceptible to a particular bacteriophage and demonstrated by phage typing. Called also lysotype and phagotype.
pyknic type a constitutional type marked by rounded body, large chest, thick shoulders, broad head, and short neck.

type

(tīp),
1. The usual form, or a composite form, that all others of the class resemble more or less closely; a model, denoting especially a disease or a symptom complex giving the stamp or characteristic to a class.
See also: constitution, habitus, personality.
2. In chemistry, a substance in which the arrangement of the atoms in a molecule may be taken as representative of other substances in that class.
3. A specific variation of a structure. Synonym(s): typus [TA], variation (2)
[G. typos, a mark, a model]

type

(tīp) the general or prevailing character of any particular case of disease, person, substance, etc.
blood type  see blood group.
constitutional type  a constellation of traits related to body build.
mating type  in ciliate protozoa, certain bacteria, and certain fungi, the equivalent of a sex.
phage type  an intraspecies type of bacterium demonstrated by phage typing.
wild type  in genetics, the standard phenotype for any experimental organism; also a gene that determines a standard phenotypic trait.

type

(tīp)
n.
1. A number of people or things having in common traits or characteristics that distinguish them as a group or class.
2. A person, thing, or model having the features of a group or class.
3. The type specimen, type species, or type genus, which serves as the basis for the name of a species, genus, or family.
v.
1. To assign to a category.
2. To determine the antigenic characteristics of a blood or tissue sample.

type

the general or prevailing character of any particular case, such as of a disease, person or substance.

type

A simple way of classifying practically anything is to divide it into 2 or more 'types'; in general, typing keeps the number of subgroups to a minimum, while satisfying those with obsessive-compulsive neuroses who are driven to classify diseases, objects, people and mechanisms

type

(tīp)
1. The usual form or a composite that all others of the class resemble more or less closely; a model, denoting especially a disease or a symptom complex giving the stamp or characteristic to a class.
See also: constitution, habitus, personality
2. chemistry A substance in which the arrangement of the atoms in a molecule may be taken as representative of other substances in that class.
Synonym(s): typus.
[G. typos, a mark, a model]

type

(tīp)
Usual form, or a composite form, which all others of the class resemble more or less closely; model, denoting especially a disease or a symptom complex giving the stamp or characteristic to a class.
[G. typos, a mark, a model]

type

1. the general or prevailing character of any particular case of disease, microorganism, person, substance, etc.
2. to determine or assign a character or category.

blood t's
type I to type IV hypersensitivity
type 1 muscle fiber
slow twitch muscle fiber.
type 2 muscle fiber
fast twitch muscle fiber.
wild type
the normal or naturally occurring phenotype of an organism.

Patient discussion about type

Q. how many types of cancer are they?

A. There are over 200 different types of cancer. You can develop cancer in any body organ. There are over 60 different organs in the body where you can get a cancer.

Each organ is made up of several different tissue types. For example, there is usually a surface covering of skin or epithelial tissue. Underneath that there will be some connective tissue, often containing gland cells. Underneath that there is often a layer of muscle tissue and so on. Each type of tissue is made up of specific types of cells. Cancer can develop in just about any type of cell in the body. So there is almost always more than one type of cancer that can develop in any one organ.

Q. What types of arthritis are there? I am familiar with several types of arthritis, for instance R.A or ostheoarthritis. Are there more types?

A. Arthritis is a symptom that can occur on its own as part of a known disease such as RA, osteoarthritis or Gout, and can also happen as a part of other complex of symptoms involving the joints in other diseases such as: Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, psoriasis and so on. Other diseases can mimic arthritis for instance: osteoporosis or multiple myeloma.

Q. Types of Bipolar I like to know that how many types of bipolar is there and what are its symptoms? Can any one please explain?

A. The DSM-IV (bible of psychological disorders) recognizes two disorders within the category of Bipolar disorders. Bipolar I Disorder is the characteristic cycling of depressive lows and manic highs (the extent and length of these extremes differ from person to person). Bipolar II disorder is cycling between depression and less intense hypomanias. So in a way, Bipolar II is less fun than Bipolar I. Manias and Hypomanias are not just being really happy. They are merely a period of intense energy and activity. The patient often has little control over what they say or do during this period.
There is something in Bipolar disorder called a "Mixed Episode". They are not very common but this is a very distressing period in which a person experiences symptoms from both a mania and a depression at the same time. Dark, disturbing thoughts and intense anxiety and lowered inhibitions--even panic attacks. In the words of my professor: "Mixed episodes suck".

More discussions about type
References in periodicals archive ?
There's only one for each," added the biggest customer of Marzorati, whose studio is full of old printing machines, typewriters and mechanical calculators.
Kobeissi added that her group recently sold an Arabic typewriter from the 1950s for close to $120, which is not exactly a cheap bargain.
Because the Corona #3 was so much lighter and more compact than other models, the Corona Typewriter Company marketed it as "The Personal Writing Machine" It had three banks of keys and a double carriage shift--one for capitals and one for figures.
In addition to its contributions to business efficiency, the typewriter played a critical role in the burgeoning of literature in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
It's a miracle that journalists did not die of a heart attack while working on a story on these machines because when you are on a deadline, typewriters choose to be very moody.
Al-Andari's services at the Institute are not limited to repairing typewriters.
It may be hard to believe that a portable typewriter can be a collector's item but as with all modern design antiques it depends on who designed it.
But to a graduate student in Ann Arbor, Michigan in the late 1960s and early 1970s, merely having access to a Hebrew typewriter, let alone owning one, was the stuff of which pipe dreams were made.
There won't be many readers out there who used an old- fashioned typewriter.
But nothing prepared Avena for the gradual disappearance of the typewriter as offices and homes welcomed the arrival of the computer.
The Typewriter Revolution: A Typist's Companion for the 21st Century
Synopsis: On August 16, 1952, Ian Fleming wrote to his wife, Ann, "My love, This is only a tiny letter to try out my new typewriter and to see if it will write golden words since it is made of gold.