tympanosclerosis

tympanosclerosis

 [tim″pah-no-sklĕ-ro´sis]
a condition characterized by the presence of masses of hard, dense connective tissue around the auditory ossicles in the middle ear.

tym·pan·o·scle·ro·sis

(tim'pă-nō-sklĕ-rō'sis),
The formation of dense connective tissue in the middle ear, often resulting in hearing loss when the ossicles are involved. See: myringosclerosis.
[tympano- + sclerosis]

tym·pan·o·scle·ro·sis

(tim'pă-nō-skler-ō'sis)
The formation of dense connective tissue in the middle ear, often resulting in hearing loss when the ossicles are involved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Appearance consistent with tympanosclerosis, myringosclerosis or cholesteatoma was identified;
pylori and tympanosclerosis. Using PCR, they detected tympanal H.
Manubrio-stapedioplasty: new surgical technique for malleus and incus fixation due to tympanosclerosis. J Laryngol Otol 2015; 129: 587-90.
Tympanosclerosis, which is not likely to be clinically significant unless it is extensive, persistent perforation, granulation tissue formation, cholesteatoma and sensorineural hearing loss are among the other complications with grommet.
Furthermore, SOM can disrupt middle ear structures and cause permanent sequelae, including tympanic membrane perforation, chronic suppurative otitis media, tympanosclerosis, adhesive otitis media, middle ear bone necrosis, retraction pocket, cholesteatoma, and sensorineural hearing loss.
However, it is widely known that the damage to the tympanic membrane caused by TT placement can lead to residual perforations, persistent otorrhea, tube rejection or tympanosclerosis, as well as various adverse reactions, including postoperative persistent otorrhea, infection rejection, and replacement of TT, among others.[2] Furthermore, TT placement only temporarily replaces the ventilation function of the ET and does not treat the lesions in the ET itself.
In addition, patients with pathologic tympanometry findings and those with known chronic ear and mastoid process inflammation, hearing amplified subjects and those with otosclerosis, tympanosclerosis and acute tinnitus persisting for up to three months, as well as facial nerve disorders of specific etiology and those associated with neurologic disorders were not considered eligible for inclusion in the study.
Bayazit et al similarly found that the dehiscence rate was higher in patients with cholesteatoma, followed by adhesive otitis media, chronic otitis media, and tympanosclerosis. (6) The canal dehiscence was mainly seen in the tympanic segment and the second genu and was rarely seen in the mastoid segment.
Recently chronic suppurative otitis media has been classified into the following types; active mucosal, inactive mucosal, active squamous, inactive squamous and healed (dimeric, tympanosclerosis etc).
Recurrent inflammation from chronic OM can also lead to tympanosclerosis. The chronic inflammation leads to deposition of hyalinized collagen that can calcify, often associated with calcification of the ossicular ligaments and tendons.
Other associated fibrotic conditions include contracture of the plantar fascia (Ledderhose disease) and tympanosclerosis (Jordan & McCammon, 2012).
The most significant complication of OME is permanent conductive hearing loss, but tinnitus, cholesteatoma, or tympanosclerosis may also occur.