tympanoplasty


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tympanoplasty

 [tim´pah-no-plas″te]
plastic reconstruction of the bones of the middle ear, with establishment of ossicular continuity from the tympanic membrane to the oval window. This surgical procedure is performed when chronic infection or tumor has led to destruction of the ossicles, of the pars petrosa of the temporal bone, or both. Because the ossicles are so small, the surgery must be done under magnification with an operating microscope. Tympanoplasty requires great surgical skill and the use of specially designed instruments. It is often done in preference to radical mastoidectomy and offers the advantage of greater preservation of hearing. (For patient care after tympanoplasty, see surgery of the ear.) adj., adj tympanoplas´tic.

tym·pa·no·plas·ty

(tim'pă-nō-plas'tē),
Operative correction of a damaged middle ear.
[tympano- + G. plassō, to form]

tympanoplasty

/tym·pa·no·plas·ty/ (tim´pah-no-plas″te) surgical reconstruction of the tympanic membrane and establishment of ossicular continuity from the tympanic membrane to the oval window.tympanoplas´tic

tympanoplasty

(tĭm′pə-nə-plăs′tē, -nō-)
n. pl. tympanoplas·ties
Surgical repair or reconstruction of the middle ear.

tympanoplasty

[timpan′əplas′tē]
Etymology: Gk, tympanon + plassein, to mold
any of several operative procedures on the eardrum or ossicles of the middle ear designed to restore or improve hearing in patients with conductive hearing loss. These operations may be used to repair a perforated eardrum, for otosclerosis, or for dislocation or necrosis of one of the small bones of the middle ear. See also myringoplasty, stapedectomy.

tympanoplasty

ENT A technique of middle ear reconstruction intended to restore hearing, which consists of 2 components
1. Tympanic membrane engraftment, using various materials including canal skin, fascia, and homografts–eg, dura, periosteum, knee cartilage, ossicles and ossicular replacement with hydroxyapatite prostheses.

tym·pa·no·plas·ty

(tim'pă-nō-plas'tē)
Operative correction of a damaged middle ear.
[tympano- + G. plassō, to form]

tympanoplasty

An operation to reconstitute a severed linkage in the chain of tiny bones (auditory ossicles) lying between the eardrum and the oval window of the inner ear, so as to restore hearing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the many graft materials for tympanoplasty procedures that have been described, fascia of the temporal muscle and cartilage has been preferred.
Patients diagnosed with chronic perforated otitis media who underwent tympanoplasty under general anesthesia by five board-certified otologists at our institution from January 2009 to December 2011 were included in this study.
In 5 cases, the operated ear had a residual perforation at the end of 3 months with no definite cause discernible; 4 failures occurred in primary tympanic membrane perforations and there was 1 failure in post tympanoplasty residual perforations.
A tympanoplasty operation was applied to all patients in the same way, and tragal perichondro chondral graft was used in tympanic membrane repair of all patients.
The most commonly used approaches for tympanoplasty are; end aural, post aural and permeatal.
Type of Study: This retrospective study includes all patients who underwent tympanoplasty with cortical mastoidectomy surgery.
Tympanoplasty type 1 in children: an evaluative study.
Although most of these perforations heal spontaneously over weeks to months, those that do not heal can become chronic perforations requiring tympanoplasty (surgical operation performed for the reconstruction of the eardrum).
Tympanoplasty, either transcanal or postaural, leads to closure in more than 90% of patients.
In total, 83 patients who underwent intact canal tympanoplasty with mastoidectomy between 2010 and 2015 were included and divided into two different groups: malleus assembly to the stapes head (MASH) and tympanic membrane assembly to the stapes head (TASH).
Different TM reconstruction techniques for tympanoplasty using different types of grafts, including temporalis fascia, perichondrium, palisade cartilage and cartilage island, have been described.