tympanoplasty

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tympanoplasty

 [tim´pah-no-plas″te]
plastic reconstruction of the bones of the middle ear, with establishment of ossicular continuity from the tympanic membrane to the oval window. This surgical procedure is performed when chronic infection or tumor has led to destruction of the ossicles, of the pars petrosa of the temporal bone, or both. Because the ossicles are so small, the surgery must be done under magnification with an operating microscope. Tympanoplasty requires great surgical skill and the use of specially designed instruments. It is often done in preference to radical mastoidectomy and offers the advantage of greater preservation of hearing. (For patient care after tympanoplasty, see surgery of the ear.) adj., adj tympanoplas´tic.

tym·pa·no·plas·ty

(tim'pă-nō-plas'tē),
Operative correction of a damaged middle ear.
[tympano- + G. plassō, to form]

tympanoplasty

(tĭm′pə-nə-plăs′tē, -nō-)
n. pl. tympanoplas·ties
Surgical repair or reconstruction of the middle ear.

tympanoplasty

ENT A technique of middle ear reconstruction intended to restore hearing, which consists of 2 components
1. Tympanic membrane engraftment, using various materials including canal skin, fascia, and homografts–eg, dura, periosteum, knee cartilage, ossicles and ossicular replacement with hydroxyapatite prostheses.

tym·pa·no·plas·ty

(tim'pă-nō-plas'tē)
Operative correction of a damaged middle ear.
[tympano- + G. plassō, to form]

tympanoplasty

An operation to reconstitute a severed linkage in the chain of tiny bones (auditory ossicles) lying between the eardrum and the oval window of the inner ear, so as to restore hearing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the 147 tympanoplasties performed due to CSOM in the aforementioned period, OC lesions in 40 (27.2%) cases were found.
Table 2 summarizes the outcomes in primary tympanoplasties versus revisions.
When comparing the outcomes of primary tympanoplasties with revision cases, primary surgeries appear to provide better results, both with regard to closing the perforation of the tympanic membrane and also hearing improvement, according to previous studies [4, 18, 20].
However, since these measurement tools are not routinely available yet, and the patients' willingness for further trials after one or more unsuccessful tympanoplasties is finite, the role of latent OC mobility in the inferior results of revision surgeries remains the subject of speculation.
et al, (1) reported success rate of 90.2% (intact graft during follow up) Carr MM et al (2) reported 79% success in paediatric cases whereas Tos M3 reported 89% intact graft in his series of paediatric tympanoplasties. In our study there were 6 patients below 16 years of age Reperforation was seen in 1 case (16 6%) and intact graft was seen in 83.4% of the cases.
In our study the mean A-B gap closure in various types of tympanoplasties are as follows
(15) studied 122 cases, 115 tympanoplasties (94%) were anatomically successful The mean air-bone gap improved significantly from 21 7 dB preoperatively to 8.4 dB postoperatively giving a mean gain of 13.3 dB.
Although I speak only for myself, I am quite sure that surgeons who are considered to be otologists/neurotologists do many more stapedectomies, chronic ear procedures, cochlear implants, tympanoplasties, and procedures for benign and malignant tumors of the ear canal and pinna than they do intracranial or medial temporal bone procedures.
Local standby anesthesia was used for all adult stapedotomies as well as for selected adult tympanoplasties, depending on the wishes of the patient.
Doyle points out, "The device will be primarily used as a postoperative dressing devise for mastoidectomies, tympanomastoidectomics, and tympanoplasties, but it will also be useful after external ear surgery, as a protective covering to diminish postoperative pain.