tympanic temperature


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Related to tympanic temperature: axillary temperature

tympanic temperature

The temperature obtained by placing an electronic probe in the ear canal. Such a reading measures the temperature in the capillary bed of the tympanic membrane and is generally reflective of the core temperature.
See: ear thermometry; thermometer, tympanic
See also: temperature
References in periodicals archive ?
The increase in heart rate in final measurements is especially significant, with an average increase of 11.42 bpm (95 percent CI 9.17 to 13.67, p < 0.001), as well as in tympanic temperature, with an average increase of 0.55[degrees]C (95 percent CI 0.46 to 0.64, p < 0.001) with respect to the baseline measurements.
Tympanic temperature and heart rate changes in firefighters during treadmill runs performed with different fireproof jackets.
Subjects paused playing the game at the end of each level while the tympanic temperature was measured then subjects voted on sensation and comfort.
Nurses should be aware that lying on the ear prior to tympanic temperature measurement in this ipsilateral ear can lead to erroneous measurements.
Tympanic temperature and heart rate turned out to be extraordinarily sensitive to ambient temperature, so lack of any substantial effect of the drinks on these variables is unlikely to be due to problems with measurement.
The main objective of our study was to assess diagnostic accuracy of infrared thermometry for detecting patients with fever, defined as a tympanic temperature [greater than or equal to] 38.0[degrees]C.
* OUTCOMES MEASURED Tympanic temperature and symptom questionnaires (mood, wellness/illness, drooling, sleep, diarrhea/constipation, strong diapers, rashes, and flushing) were compared on toothdays and non-toothdays.
The continuous 24-hour tympanic temperature was recorded by using TherCom[R] temperature monitoring device [23, 24].
Participants' tympanic temperature was obtained because a subnormal tympanic temperature can result in an artificially low oximetry result (DeMeulenaere, 2007).
Tympanic temperatures. Numerous researchers have compared tympanic temperature devices to other temperature devices but few have performed the proper statistical analysis of the data (Erickson & Meyer, 1994; Giuliano, Scott, Elliott, & Giuliano, 1999; Klein et al., 1993).
Muma, Treloar, Wurmlinger, Peterson, and Vitae (1991) compared rectal, axillary, and tympanic temperatures in infants and young children.
In the first chart, 95% of the time it is estimated that the patient's temperature when measured with a tympanic temperature will differ in the range of +0.36 to -2.78 of the estimated true value.