tylosis


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Related to tylosis: tylosis palmaris et plantaris

tylosis

 [ti-lo´sis]
the formation of calluses. adj., adj tylot´ic.

ty·lo·sis

, pl.

ty·lo·ses

(tī-lō'sis, -sēz),
Formation of a callus (tyloma).
[G. a becoming callous]

tylosis

(tī-lō′sĭs)
n. pl. tylo·ses (-sēz)

ty·lo·sis

, pl. tyloses (tī-lō'sis, -sēz)
Formation of a callosity (tyloma).
[G. a becoming callous]
References in periodicals archive ?
However, in tylosis patients' cells, and in cells from oesophageal cancers, the gene malfunctions.
Her oldest son Christopher,44, has tylosis,as does her daughter Janet, 33, who has passed it on to her own daughter Heather,12.
They found 300 members in a single family from Liverpool, all over 20, who have tylosis and are also at risk of developing the disease.
Long-term achalasia, lye strictures due to ingestion, Plummer-Vinson syndrome, and tylosis (a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder) may also predispose an individual to squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus.
Similarly in cases of palms and soles involvement without other skin lesion, the diagnosis was made by excluding the other causes of palmoplantar hyperkeratosis like tinea, tylosis, etc.
Risk et al., "RHBDF2 mutations are associated with tylosis, a familial esophageal cancer syndrome," The American Journal of Human Genetics, vol.
PROFESSOR John Field (pictured below) at Liverpool university has led the research into tylosis. His team of experts have now found a gene that may be responsible for the disease.
But, in common with her relatives who have suffered from the same form of cancer, she also carries the faulty gene linked to tylosis, a mild skin disorder.
Chestnut oak is used as a structural timber but because it has very limited tylosis formation in the vessels the species is prone to leakage and, like most European oak the stave must be straight grained.
Carcinoma of the oesophagus with keratosis palmaris et plantaris (tylosis): a study of two families.
More than 340 members of a Liverpool family - spanning seven generations - have been affected by a genetic disorder called tylosis.
By contrast, 161-49 C is notoriously difficult to establish due to tylosis problems with young vines.