tylosis

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tylosis

 [ti-lo´sis]
the formation of calluses. adj., adj tylot´ic.

ty·lo·sis

, pl.

ty·lo·ses

(tī-lō'sis, -sēz),
Formation of a callus (tyloma).
[G. a becoming callous]

tylosis

/ty·lo·sis/ (-sis) formation of callosities.tylot´ic

tylosis

(tī-lō′sĭs)
n. pl. tylo·ses (-sēz)

tylosis

[tīlō′sis]
formation of a callus.

ty·lo·sis

, pl. tyloses (tī-lō'sis, -sēz)
Formation of a callosity (tyloma).
[G. a becoming callous]

tylosis

formation of callosities.
References in periodicals archive ?
com" (Richter and Dallwitz 2002) shows some similarities in the anatomy of the samples from Costa Rica, such as the distinct and indistinct growth ring, tyloses and crystals presence, fiber dimensions, type, and distribution of the vessels and axial parenchyma.
Aditionally, the presence of tyloses in laticifer canals in Conzatia could be a mechanism to constrain the dispersal of pathogens.
Red oak lumber can be separated from white oak by the number of pores in summerwood and because, as a rule, it lacks the membranous growth known as tyloses in the pores.
Under high internal pressure, the pit membranes in cell walls, tyloses in vessels, and weak ray cells are ruptured to form pathways for easy transportation of liquids and vapors (Vinden et al.
The plant then seems to try to wall off the invading fungus in the vascular tissue, producing dark gums and vesselblocking cells called tyloses.
Because the wood has a preponderance of tyloses in the pores, which make it impossible for liquids to seep through, oak makes wonderful casks.
Under high internal steam pressure, the pit membranes in cell walls, tyloses in vessels, and the weak ray cells rupture to form pathways for easy transportation of liquids and vapors.
Red oak, as the opposite example, doesn't have these natural tyloses and can't be used for barrels because any liquid inside would seep out through the stave ends everywhere.
As oak (red and white) is an important species with 50 percent of the wood flooring market (Anonymous 2006), and as it is among the species known to be prone to check due to the important presence of tyloses, and to limit the parameters of the study, white oak was selected for this study.
The fungus initially invades the xylem parenchyma cells, rather than the xylem vessels themselves, and stimulates the formation of tyloses, which are responsible for blocking of the vessels (Pascoe).
The data suggest that emissions were inhibited in white oak, possibly by tyloses.
A more complete chemical identification of the tyloses which form inside the xylem tissue and block the flow of sap in infected plants.