two-dimensional imaging

two-dimensional imaging

An MRI term for the Fourier transformation process, which reconstructs the detected frequency and phase-encoded image information—which are rotated 90° from each other—into a usable image.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, conventional AR systems that use two-dimensional imaging require high volumes of pictures for large-scale inspections.
Vitalscan can be used in hospital A&E departments directly at a patient's bedside and produces two-dimensional imaging maps of the patient's heart.
Until recently, two-dimensional imaging technologies were the standard to identify coronary arteries that are candidates for stent insertion.
Two-dimensional imaging is replaced with three dimensional technique in the da Vinci robot with increased perception and magnification.
The 3-D images revealed information about the number and location of the bacteria, to the level of precisely revealing where within the tumor the bacteria were living, providing much more information on the interaction of bacteria and tumors than was previously available using similar two-dimensional imaging methods.
These tunable filters are suitable for fluorescence microscopy and measurement applications, as well as hyperspectral imaging, high-throughput spectroscopy and any other optical system that can benefit from the spectral and two-dimensional imaging performance of thin-film filters.
Two-dimensional imaging technologies have been used in medicine for a long time, said Winer, an Iowa State University associate professor o mechanical engineering.
After World War II, two-dimensional imaging became available and remains in use today.
These combine the digital camera's conventional two-dimensional imaging with spectroscopy to analyze various wavelengths of reflected light.
With 3D interactivity, students are engaged in simulated, immersive experiences that deliver multi-dimensional understanding that standard two-dimensional imaging can't touch," said Chris Ward, president of Lightspeed Design, Inc.
In simple terms, three-dimensional imaging provides additional information over two-dimensional imaging technology in treating patients, but it is too expensive to be used in most medical offices.
Traditional two-dimensional imaging techniques simply can't reveal the full complexity of biological cells.

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