twitch

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twitch

 [twich]
a brief, contractile response of a skeletal muscle elicited by a single maximal volley of impulses in the neurons supplying it.

twitch

(twich),
1. To jerk spasmodically.
2. A momentary spasmodic contraction of a muscle fiber.
[A.S. twiccian]

twitch

(twĭch)
v. twitched, twitching, twitches
v.tr.
To draw, pull, or move suddenly and sharply; jerk: I twitched my fishing line.
v.intr.
1. To move jerkily or spasmodically.
2. To ache sharply from time to time; twinge.
n.
1. A sudden involuntary or spasmodic muscular movement: a twitch of the eye.
2. A sudden pulling; a tug: The fish gave my line a twitch.
3. A sudden, sharp pain.

twitch′ing·ly adv.

twitch

Body twitch Sleep disorders A small body movement–eg, a facial grimace or finger jerk, not usually associated with arousal. See REM twitch.

twitch

(twich)
1. To jerk spasmodically.
2. A momentary spasmodic contraction of a muscle fiber.
[A.S. twiccian]

twitch

A brief muscular contraction resulting from a sudden spontaneous impulse in a nerve supplying a group of muscle fibres. Twitching is common and is seldom of any medical significance.

twitch

(twich)
1. To jerk spasmodically.
2. Momentary spasmodic contraction of a muscle fiber.
[A.S. twiccian]

Patient discussion about twitch

Q. What causes twitching I deal with insomnia,and sometimes i sleep very sound. What causes the twitching during sleeping.Went to bed at 10 pm, and 2 30 this morning my boyfriend was woke up by me twitching. What is the cause of this. I also drink alot of coffee, could that be a factor with it.

A. Twitching during sleep is not something we can control, and it is a very normal event during sleep. Some people experience it more than others, and it's not necessarily connected to you drinking a lot of coffee. Caffiene consumtion can cause slight tremor but not during sleep. Twiching while awake is caused by small fibers of muscles contracting and is also normal. Heavy twiching is something that requires further blood test because certain electrolyte imbalances can cause it.

Q. my sons arm started twitching in the mornings. is that normal? it's scary, not every morning, but once in a while (twice a week maybe more) he's right arm just twitches without control for 2-3 minutes. can i stop it? should i try to restrain him? does any one know this situation?

A. was your son ever diagnosed for epilepsy? if this is the case, it's not dangerous (unless he holds a knife...) so don't restrain him - it can do only damage. but you should be aware that if the seizure does not stop after 3-5 minutes- you should call an ambulance. and don't panic, your son will be O.K :)

Q. eyelids what causes your eye lids too twitch? my left eye lid has been twitching on and off for about a week what causes it and how can i get it to stop.

A. Not an answer, just another question - how long can this go on? My eyelid has been twitching, (likely lack of sleep) for almost a month now. Any treatment that I should seek?

More discussions about twitch
References in periodicals archive ?
To estimate the relationship of the evoked twitches with the level of voluntary force Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) analysis were employed, using an exchangeable correlation structure for non-independent data (Hanley et al., 2003).
Additionally, the resting twitches evoked by magnetic stimulation (Time to peak = 75 [+ or -] 10 ms) reached their peak force 13 [+ or -] 10 ms (p < 0.05) later than the twitches evoked by electrical stimulation (Time to peak=62 [+ or -] 11 ms).
The mean amplitude of the twitches evoked at MVC was not significantly different between electrical (0.62 [+ or -] 0.49 N) and magnetic (0.81 [+ or -] 0.49 N) stimulation (p>0.05).
The active twitches decreased with the level of voluntary force and this was significant, ([F.sub.(6, 36)] = 86.37, p < 0.001, [eta] [p.sup.2] = 0.94).
Despite the differences in the resting evoked twitches, the voluntary activation of elbow flexors was not statistically different between the two types of stimulation used in its determination, ([F.sub.1, 6]) = 0.14, p > 0.05, [eta] [p.sup.2] = 0.02) (Figure 4).
In addition the BB evoked twitches at maximum contractions and the M-waves of all tested muscles, but APB, were similar between electrical and magnetic stimulation.
However, the differences in the curve fitting between electrical and magnetic stimulation revealed in our study could be due to the larger resting twitches evoked by electrical stimulation implying larger current spread of electrical stimulation especially with the widely space stimulating electrodes.
This larger current spread with widely space stimulating electrodes likely contributes to producing larger twitches evoked by electrical stimulation.
The differences in the resting twitches between this study and the previously published ones using magnetic stimulation may also depend on the magnetic stimulation characteristics and the magnitude of the induced electric field in the tissues (Jalinous, 1991).