twinge

(redirected from twinges)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

twinge

(twinj),
A sudden momentary sharp pain.

twinge

[twinj]
Etymology: ME, twengen, to pinch
a sudden, brief, darting pain.

twinge

(twinj)
A sudden momentary sharp pain.

twinge

(twinj)
A sudden momentary sharp pain.
References in classic literature ?
Though he could steal a dog, or a cat, without a twinge of conscience, he could not but be faithful to his salt, being so made.
A contrite heart and ten nobles to holy mother Church may stave off perdition; but he hath a pardon of the first degree, with a twenty-five livre benison, so that I doubt if he will so much as feel a twinge of purgatory.
He was certainly serious--a twinge of ossified conscience or something; and so I considered with grave deliberation for a moment.
Evelyn Howard had been right then, and I experienced a sharp twinge of disgust, as I thought of Alfred Inglethorp's liberality with another woman's money.
I know not why, but I was aware of a twinge or pang like the cut of a knife when he mentioned her.
Oh, yes, my agonies were frightful," Becky owned, not perhaps without a twinge of conscience.
However often he told himself that he was in no wise to blame in it, that recollection, like other humiliating reminiscences of a similar kind, made him twinge and blush.
Mindful of the wondering dinner, Twemlow, with a little twinge, admits the imputation.
Weller said this, the man's features assumed an unearthly twinge, perfectly hideous.
Kit did suffer one twinge, one momentary pang, in keeping the resolution he had already formed, when this last argument passed swiftly into his thoughts, and conjured up the realization of all his hopes and fancies.
I called the hospital and they told me to have a bath and keep timing the twinges.
This can lead to dentine - the inner fibres of the tooth - becoming exposed; the cause of those painful twinges when you eat or drink something hot, cold or sugary.