twilight sleep


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twilight sleep

n.
An amnesic condition characterized by insensibility to pain without loss of consciousness, induced by an injection of morphine and scopolamine, especially to relieve the pain of childbirth.
Anaesthetics
(1) A synonym for IV sedation
(2) A dream-like state of conscious sedation induced by Versed, an agent used for minimally invasive surgery—e.g., colonoscopy—or minor oral procedures without general anesthesia; Versed is associated with sudden deaths, possibly related to ‘overshooting’ therapeutic levels. See Versed. Cf Dauerschlaff, Continuous sleep therapy
Medical history An amnesic state characterised by insensibility to pain without loss of consciousness, induced by an injection of morphine and scopolamine

twilight sleep

Anesthesiology A dream-like state of 'conscious sedation' induced by Versed, an agent used for minimally invasive surgery–eg, colonoscopy or minor oral procedures, without general anesthesia; Versed is associated with sudden deaths, possibly related to 'overshooting' therapeutic levels. See Versed. Cf Dauerschlaff, Continuous sleep therapy.

twilight sleep

A popular term formerly used for a state of relative insensitivity to pain and partial consciousness, induced by drugs such as morphine and scopolamine, to ease the pains of childbirth.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is hardly the "warm and jolly and inconsequent" scene described in Twilight Sleep. Larsen has transplanted the players and altered the narrative point of view such that a biracial female protagonist can gaze critically, from the inside, at how her own black countrymen cop minstrel-like poses in order to ingratiate their white Anglo Saxon audience, and can indict, too, the "pale pink and white people" entranced by the Jim Crows-tyle performance.
Jewel is the son who rides his mother's coffin to escape from (to borrow a key phrase from Twilight Sleep) the "geometrical representation[s]" as he preserves the mother by going out in flames.
We intend here to approach Wharton's engagement with the modern world in her fiction by examining Twilight Sleep as a hybrid text in which she combines the effects of realism with elements of the Gothic mode in order to make distinct her satiric vision.
Family problems are treated in The Mother's Recompense (1925), Twilight Sleep (1927), and The Children (1928).
Thanks to her method of "twilight sleep"--a conscious sedation produced by sedatives and a local anesthesia --Dr.
For your husband's colonoscopy, he'll probably be given moderate sedation, which will send him into a "twilight sleep," in which he'll drift in and out of consciousness, but be easily aroused.
Zak's contribution addresses the modern body as it appears in Twilight Sleep, reading the novel as a modernist text that allows us to see the way it "explores American culture's coming-to-terms with new ideas about the human body" (112).
Edith Wharton's 1927 novel Twilight Sleep has consistently suffered from a lack of critical scrutiny because, perhaps, when it is paired with better-known novels like The House of Mirth, The Age of Innocence, or The Custom of the Country, it appears rather anomalous-Madam Wharton, novelist of elite drawing rooms from New York to Paris, does the Jazz Age.
Troubling and admittedly imperfect, The Mother's Recompense (1925), Twilight Sleep (1927), and The Children (1928) are novels with interesting critical receptions, and challenge some received notions about Wharton derived from her better-known work; with equal claim to sit above the salt with Ethan Frome and Summer are the four brilliant novellas of Old New York (1924).
Describing Twilight Sleep as Wharton's most "political" novel, Bauer investigates the implications of "mechanized childbirth" (p.
Some to the articles clearly disturbed--such as the historic account of "Twilight Sleep" and the biographical sketch of "Joseph Bolivar Delee." I thought Rahima Baldwin's entry on "TORCH Syndrome" was informative, but think she could have also done some of the other subjects as well.
Finally, in Edith Wharton's late novel Twilight Sleep, the flapper Nona Manford achieves "realist prestige" (115) when she discovers her father's "incestuous passion for his daughter-in-law" (100).