twilight sleep


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twilight sleep

n.
An amnesic condition characterized by insensibility to pain without loss of consciousness, induced by an injection of morphine and scopolamine, especially to relieve the pain of childbirth.
Anaesthetics
(1) A synonym for IV sedation
(2) A dream-like state of conscious sedation induced by Versed, an agent used for minimally invasive surgery—e.g., colonoscopy—or minor oral procedures without general anesthesia; Versed is associated with sudden deaths, possibly related to ‘overshooting’ therapeutic levels. See Versed. Cf Dauerschlaff, Continuous sleep therapy
Medical history An amnesic state characterised by insensibility to pain without loss of consciousness, induced by an injection of morphine and scopolamine

twilight sleep

Anesthesiology A dream-like state of 'conscious sedation' induced by Versed, an agent used for minimally invasive surgery–eg, colonoscopy or minor oral procedures, without general anesthesia; Versed is associated with sudden deaths, possibly related to 'overshooting' therapeutic levels. See Versed. Cf Dauerschlaff, Continuous sleep therapy.

twilight sleep

A popular term formerly used for a state of relative insensitivity to pain and partial consciousness, induced by drugs such as morphine and scopolamine, to ease the pains of childbirth.

Entanox

; twilight sleep inhaled mix of 50:50 air and nitrous oxide; induces partial anaesthesia, analgesia and amnesia

twilight sleep,

n a light general anesthesia obtained by the parenteral administration of a mixture of morphine and scopolamine to reduce pain and obtund recall in childbirth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Faulkner would have known that Wharton's reference in Twilight Sleep to a cinematic project entitled "Herodias" was to a particular film: the famed 1923 production of Wilde's Salome, nominally directed by Charles Bryant who is said to have taken his direction from Alla Nazimov (the leading lady who was his openly lesbian wife) and Natacha Rambova (author of the screen play and in charge of art direction and costumes who was Rudolf Valentino's wife).
Most notably, the boudoir of the aspiring Salome of Twilight Sleep is newly decorated in all black.
In a characteristically specific reference, Wharton's allusion in Twilight Sleep to the "cubist decorator['s]" decision to cover up a window that frames what to him is an unacceptably picturesque sight of the "Brooklyn Bridge and the East River," is designed to replace the framed view of the composition recognizable as that of a particular painting: Whistler's much admired, twilight portrayal called Nocturne in Blue and Gold--Old Battersea Bridge [Fig.
Throughout her notes, as the novel is plotted, 'Manford' and 'Manfred' alternate; although in the final published version she opts for the former, it is clear that The Castle of Otranto is in her mind as she works out the detail of Twilight Sleep.
The attempted murder, the sobbing, the screaming, and the blood-bespattered garments evoke the mood and tenor of opera, the Gothic, and melodrama, suggesting that Twilight Sleep can be read as a comic appropriation of the Gothic.
In Twilight Sleep Wharton is, of course, drawing on a tradition not only of English but also American Gothic.
Tommy Ardwin functions in Twilight Sleep as Jack Stepney does in The House of Mirth: both are gatekeepers who bring to upper-class New York various othered individuals.
In 1925, two years before Wharton completed Twilight Sleep, Kip filed an annulment suit to end his brief marriage to Alice Jones.
Divorce in Twilight Sleep, conversely, does not secure financial or social gain but rather concerns an impossible quest for self-fulfillment.
Like The Mother's Recompense, Twilight Sleep shows the difference twenty years makes in New York attitudes toward divorce and remarriage, but this later novel examines the social scene from the view opposing Kate's.
This is hardly the "warm and jolly and inconsequent" scene described in Twilight Sleep.
Further, Irene's decidedly "unseeing eyes" (177, 250) evoke Newland Archer's similarly described unreliable gaze in The Age of Innocence (1920) and the numerous pairs of "unseeing eyes" (175) that peer out of Twilight Sleep.