tussock

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tussock

a large tuft of grass or a patch of ground held together by roots found in tundra and wet grasslands.
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In the 2-year grass + luceme+ medic ley, it was not possible to remove the tough, tussocky bases of buffel grass to achieve close to 0% cover and the minimum surface cover was still ~20% in this treatment.
25) On his first ascent he made camp at 8000 feet (2438 metres) where tall trees were still in evidence, but by the time he had reached 9000 feet (2743 metres) he noted the end of the forests and the emergence of tussocky grasses.
The dry, tussocky crowns of pampas are another favoured site for hibernating hedgehogs.
After the Maki 'No' vote, the mayor (Takaaki Sasaguchi, a sake brewer) used his power to buy the site at Kakumihama--less than a hectare, nothing more than a bit of crumbling earth cliff, with rough tussocky grass and a sick looking drain running through it directly on to the beach--which he then sold on to the protesters' organisation.
The farmers' fields ran right down to the dunes and the tussocky marram grass .
Each beach is more beautiful than the one before - mountains sweeping down to white sands and glinting waves, mile after mile of tussocky dunes, craggy cliffs, quaint seaside villages, curling breakers, sailboats on the horizon, technicolor sunsets.
The moorland can be tussocky in places and boggy in wet conditions.
Povinelli (1993) reports that people of the Cox Peninsula (Beluyen) attribute the advance of a tussocky grass across a particular countryside not to the intervention of a Dreaming but, rather, to the neglect of a Dreaming by those who once served it.
One day all the creeks and the little watercourses were covered in a large tussocky grass, with other grasses and plants .
She had been a hunt horse before she came my way and looking over the tops of her ears as she gazed intently at the hounds feathering away across the patch of ground in front of us I truly believed, with Snaffles, that it was 'the finest view in the world' only it was not across the smooth pa stures, neat copses and well made fences of the Shires, but onto acres of tussocky, dun coloured grass pockmarked with the vivid green of shallow bog and fringed by brown moorland.