turnover

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turn·o·ver

(tŭrn'ō-vĕr),
The quantity of a material metabolized or processed, usually within a given length of time.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

turnover

A business term for the frequency with which something is renewed—e.g., staff or labour turnover.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

turn·o·ver

(tŭrn'ō-vĕr)
The quantity of a material metabolized or processed, usually within a given length of time.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Public accounting firms generally expect a high turnover rate of their staff.
While some turnover of professional personnel provides for the infusion of new ideas and an opportunity for promotion and also aids in retaining and attracting client business, few firms would dispute the desirability of reducing turnover, especially in the case of those staff members who exhibit partner potential.
Three of the four Oregon turnovers at WSU were charged to Dixon, including one lost fumble on a handoff attempt to Jonathan Stewart, who was himself charged with a lost fumble on a pitch from Dixon.
`The turnovers in (the WSU) game were basically two people, and those kids are good football players who will rebound and recover,' Bellotti said.
However, financial economic research has primarily focused on the factors that impact the likelihood of CEO turnover (e.g., Warner et al., 1988; Weisbach, 1988; Parrino, 1997).
Given the importance of board committee structure and the potential for CEOs to control the composition of these committees, it is useful to examine changes in committee structu re following forced CEO turnover to determine the extent to which a new CEO is a catalyst for change in board committee structure.
Figure 1 illustrates that turnover may be 6 percent in one month and jump to 11 percent in the third month.
Nor is it safe to assume that turnover and vacancy will be eliminated by good management.
When all CEO departures occurring through nonperformance-related events (retirement, death, departure for a new company or to join government service) are combined, 83 percent of the 160 CEO turnovers are explained.
Table : Table 2 Causes of CEO Turnover (n=160 turnovers; 41 firms)
"STFA managed to increase its turnover by 70.8 percent between 2008 and 2009.
The BLS employee turnover rates for the year ending August 2006, released in October 11, 2006, showed overall U.S.