turn

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turn

(tŭrn),
To revolve or cause to revolve; specifically, to change the position of the fetus within the uterus to convert a malpresentation into a presentation permitting normal delivery.
[A.S. tyrnan]
Obstetrics Version; the rotation of a foetus for vaginal delivery
Public health The abrupt change in a domesticated animal’s behaviour, from docile to aggressive, resulting in attacks on humans, which may be fatal; turning is most common in pitbull terrriers and rottweilers, which together cause the bulk of dog bite-related fatalities in the US
References in periodicals archive ?
In theory, this chemical call to arms against a pathogen may activate immune cells that happen to be near an infection, causing them to turn against the body.
Friendships shatter as companions turn against each other in this spooky thriller that follows in the spirit of The Shining.
The entire Iraqi population will turn against Saddam Hussein - angrily destroying his pictures everywhere and toppling his statues - like they did in the south of Iraq during the Gulf War.
JOHN Gilligan's girlfriend is to turn against the crime boss.
Butterworth believes that Elian Gonzales is suffering from a form of the "Stockholm Syndrome," in which victims identify with their captors and turn against their loved ones, his father.
Let's try to remember to judge each individual on his or her own merits and not let the evil acts of terrorists cause us to turn against our fellow countrymen.
Mr Murdoch tried to cajole and bully John Major to turn against the European single currency.
Terrorism wins if we turn against each other in fear and let feelings of outrage erode our community bonds.
District Judge Michael Moore threw out a political-asylum lawsuit that cleared the way for 6-year-old Elian Gonzalez to be returned to his father in Cuba by saying that as a result of his lengthy stay in Florida, Elian could be suffering from a form of the "Stockholm Syndrome," in which hostages identify with their captors and turn against their loved ones.