turn

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turn

(tŭrn),
To revolve or cause to revolve; specifically, to change the position of the fetus within the uterus to convert a malpresentation into a presentation permitting normal delivery.
[A.S. tyrnan]
Obstetrics Version; the rotation of a foetus for vaginal delivery
Public health The abrupt change in a domesticated animal’s behaviour, from docile to aggressive, resulting in attacks on humans, which may be fatal; turning is most common in pitbull terrriers and rottweilers, which together cause the bulk of dog bite-related fatalities in the US
References in periodicals archive ?
I think it's a fad, a fashion, and I think people will turn against it," he told the Gazette while on Teesside to promote his latest book.
William Toffler, a family physician in Portland, "believes that the more physicians learn about the blunt reality of helping patients die, the more they turn against the idea.
After Wednesday the crowd is beginning to rumble and he dare not allow them to turn against him because that can be terrifying.
Either the copy is imitated, its mortuary appearance reproduced, and one surrenders without resistance to the rigid severity of that lifeless body, or that cadaver is incorporated into the work, causing the work to turn against itself, to reveal as illusory both its presumptuous self-categorization as "work" and the possibility of thinking of the work as "body.
Danger and mystery loom behind every corner on the island, and those they thought could be trusted may turn against them.
Steve Bruce was under pressure earlier in the campaign after a poor run of results saw some of his own fans turn against him.
CHIEF executive Peter Varney admitted Charlton fans were right to turn against the team during the defeat by Wycombe.
As such, it adds to evidence in support of the hygiene hypothesis, which holds that early, frequent exposure to infectious agents prepares the immune system to fight off diseases rather than to turn against a person's own tissues, as occurs in autoimmune diseases, say Anne-Louise Ponsonby of Australian National University in Canberra and her colleagues.
Now Matt (who takes the name Manta) is to spy on and turn against his new family and friends.