turn


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turn

(tŭrn),
To revolve or cause to revolve; specifically, to change the position of the fetus within the uterus to convert a malpresentation into a presentation permitting normal delivery.
[A.S. tyrnan]
Obstetrics Version; the rotation of a foetus for vaginal delivery
Public health The abrupt change in a domesticated animal’s behaviour, from docile to aggressive, resulting in attacks on humans, which may be fatal; turning is most common in pitbull terrriers and rottweilers, which together cause the bulk of dog bite-related fatalities in the US
References in classic literature ?
No one, no one in the next room, no one to turn the tap, no one to turn the scorpion!
Sometimes zero does not turn up for two hundred rounds in succession.
Instead, he turned and retreated toward the main body of gorilla-men.
"Whatcher turn?" he demanded, ere half her brief application had left her lips.
Again he faced the notice and read it through, and doubtless would have turned off again to ruminate upon it had not the sailor grasped him roughly by the collar and howled into his ear.
Nancy made a sudden queer little sound with her mouth--but when Pollyanna turned, her head was in the trunk again.
He lifted the latch, and turned into the bright bar or kitchen on the right hand, where the less lofty customers of the house were in the habit of assembling, the parlour on the left being reserved for the more select society in which Squire Cass frequently enjoyed the double pleasure of conviviality and condescension.
A twig from a tree near caught her cloak; she turned petulantly, broke it off, and threw it on the ground.
To my astonishment and horror her head went high, and as a look of utter contempt touched her finely chiseled features she turned her back full upon me.
Montgomery's movement to follow me released my attention, and I turned and looked about me at the flush deck of the little schooner.
It was far down the afternoon; and when all the spearings of the crimson fight were done: and floating in the lovely sunset sea and sky, sun and whale both stilly died together; then, such a sweetness and such plaintiveness, such inwreathing orisons curled up in that rosy air, that it almost seemed as if far over from the deep green convent valleys of the Manilla isles, the Spanish land-breeze, wantonly turned sailor, had gone to sea, freighted with these vesper hymns.
At long intervals, the warning cry of a belated gondolier was just audible, as he turned the corner of a distant canal, and called to invisible boats which might be approaching him in the darkness.