turgor pressure


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turgor pressure

a measure of the tendency of a cell to push water out of the cell, usually a positive value. Compare WALL PRESSURE.

turgor pressure

see PRESSURE POTENTIAL.
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As previously mentioned, high salt concentrations in the external environment can severely dehydrate the cell and interfere with turgor pressure but can also affect DNA replication and the structure of many cytoplasmic proteins and their associated functions.
(D) Losses of turgor pressure of parenchymatous cells of the cortex four days after inoculation: c, cortex; ph, phloem; x, xylem.
Glycerol accumulation leads to water influx through osmotic process for turgor pressure necessary for host penetration.
This occurred due to initiation of osmotic adjustment, especially in DK-4040 and SF-187 via production of compatible solute (Serraj and Sinclair, 2002) by maintaining leaf turgor pressure (Hussain et al., 2010), protecting functional proteins, enzymes (Rubisco) and lipids of photosynthetic apparatus and sustaining electron flow through thylakoid membrane (Allakhverdiev et al., 2003).
Most of the salt-tolerant plants can still function by maximizing water uptake and turgor pressure meaning that water relations are important for negating salinity stress.
Wilting of plants refers to the condition where turgor pressure is lost in response to water stress and the leaves become flaccid or 'floppy'.
Cell expansion usually begins with changes in cell turgor pressure. These changes trigger cell elongation and produce increased growth, less susceptibility to environmental stress and anticipation in the shoot establishment (TAIZ; ZEIGER, 2010).
Elevated concentrations of glucose and fructose due to greater acid invertase activity in leaves could lead to maintain leaf turgor pressure, thus enhancing the probability of survival during a large period of drought stress (Liu, 2004).
Reduction of osmotic potential is considered as a driving force in inducing water movement from the soil into the plant to maintain turgor pressure (Blum et al., 1996).
In plant cells, the firmness associated with the tissue is referred to as turgor pressure, and the cells are said to be turgid.