turgor


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turgor

 [ter´ger]
1. swelling or other distention.
2. a condition of normal tension in a cell or group of cells; fullness. adj., adj tur´gid.
skin turgor a reflection of the skin's elasticity, measured by monitoring the time it takes for the skin of the forearm to return to position after it is lightly pinched between the examiner's thumb and forefinger. Normal turgor is a return to normal contour within three seconds; if the skin remains elevated (tented) more than three seconds, turgor is decreased.
Assessing skin turgor. From Lammon et al., 1995.

tur·gor

(tŭr'gōr),
Fullness.
[L., fr. turgeo, to swell]

turgor

(tûr′gər, -gôr′)
n.
The normal fullness or tension produced by the fluid content of living cells or of blood vessels and capillaries: leaves that have lost turgor.

turgor

Physical examination Swelling of skin and subcutaneous tissue

tur·gor

(tŭr'gŏr)
Fullness.
[L., fr. turgeo, to swell]

turgor

the cell state when it has taken in a maximum amount of water, causing distension of the protoplast. The term is used mainly in connection with plant cells, which have a maximum size when turgid that is governed by how much the cellulose cell wall will stretch. See WALL PRESSURE, PRESSURE POTENTIAL, TRANSPIRATION.

tur·gor

(tŭr'gŏr)
Fullness.
[L., fr. turgeo, to swell]
References in periodicals archive ?
Physiologically, opening and closing of stomatal pores is mediated by turgor and volume changes in guard cells.
Tamarix possesses glands that produce a salty exudate, but this plant also may use inorganic ions for turgor maintenance at low water potentials (Berry 1970).
After the 8-day dry-down period, the turgor loss point (mean [+ or -] SD) was -1.21 [+ or -] 0.17 MPa for Epilobium and -1.31 [+ or -] 0.09 MPa for Anaphalis, whereas osmotic potentials at full saturation for the two species were -1.07 [+ or -] 0.11 and -1.02 [+ or -] 0.13 MPa, respectively.
The gene action study of leaf carotenoids and turgor potential is a novel piece of work in this study.
The rice leaf rolls when the specialized bulliform cells of the upper epidermis experience water loss [63], causing them to lose their turgor [64].
Among these new indicators, we can highlight measures based on sap flow, on trunk diameter variation and on leaf turgor potential.
(29) The finger should be checked postoperatively for warmth, capillary refill, and turgor. Our typical postoperative protocol is every 1 hour for the first 24 hours, then every 2 hours for the next 48 hours, and then every 4 hours for the remaining days before discharge.
Dentro desse contexto, e conveniente salientar que o primeiro efeito mensuravel do estresse hidrico e uma diminuicao no crescimento das plantulas, causada pela reducao da expansao celular, a qual necessita de um potencial de turgor adequado para um desenvolvimento satisfatorio (Taiz & Zeiger, 2009).
In most cells, the volume of the vacuole is relatively large, and its turgor is essential for the tissue turgor.