turgid

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tu·mid

(tū'mid),
Swollen, as by congestion, edema, hyperemia.
Synonym(s): turgid
[L. tumidus]

turgid

/tur·gid/ (ter´jid) swollen and congested.

turgid

(tûr′jĭd)
adj.
Swollen or distended, as from a fluid; bloated: a turgid bladder; turgid veins.

tur·gid′i·ty, tur′gid·ness n.
tur′gid·ly adv.

turgid

[tur′jid]
Etymology: L, turgidus
swollen, hard, and congested, usually as a result of an accumulation of fluid. turgor, n. Compare flaccid.

tu·mid

(tū'mid)
Swollen, as by congestion, edema, hyperemia.
Synonym(s): turgid.
[L. tumidus]

turgid

Swollen and congested.

turgid

swollen and congested.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effects of a water deficit include an increased rooting depth, fewer and thinner leaves, decreased leaf size and surface area, less tillering, reduced shoot elongation, and decreased turgidity and succulence.
On examination, the falcon was active but had decreased skin turgidity.
Koehler (1933) suggested that internal stresses caused by sudden changes in diameter growth rates, with emphasis on either greater circumferential growth than radial growth or a reduction in the turgidity of the older tissues, could account for ring shake.
The unidiomatic translations, done hastily at the time, add to the turgidity of the text.
Conversely, it is possible that apparent turgidity of this resource may be a reflection our subconscious disdain for reminders of our mortality on a global (almost biblical) scale; the epitome of our biological insignificance in the grand evolutionary game plan?
When plants lose turgidity, they wilt; each time the plant wilts, its overall potential yield is decreased.
Like much of what has gone on at Goodison this season, it proved to be a false dawn as Arsenal clicked into gear with a taste of their joyful brand of football that stands alone amid the turgidity of the Premiership at present.
Verdure (shoot biomass), load bearing capacity, leaf blade tensile strength, and relative turgidity were evaluated at the interspecies level.
The pathological changes that can occur in FBD are noted as micronodularity, tenderness, fibrous tissue plaques, macrocysts, and turgidity.
Similarly, in Que vive la Republique, Debray writes that the bicentennial of the French Revolution erased the memory of 1793, privileging instead the safer, less controversial liberal moment of 1789, because its organizers refused to 'historicize politics': they lacked 'the energy of the Renaissance, the activism of Romantics, the vitality of Louis David as a young man, going back to ancient Greece, to medieval gothic, in order to deflate the pompous turgidity of "the modern".
Mixing voices breaks up the turgidity resulting from the centripetal forces and increases the intelligibility of our arguments by using the vernacular as a bridge to the academic; the full title of Graff's book provides a nice example: Clueless in Academe: How Schooling Obscures the Life of the Mind.
I think he made the right choice, as the mid and upper bass of the Eros is wonderfully defined and free from thickness or turgidity.