turgid

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tu·mid

(tū'mid),
Swollen, as by congestion, edema, hyperemia.
Synonym(s): turgid
[L. tumidus]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

turgid

(tûr′jĭd)
adj.
Swollen or distended, as from a fluid; bloated: a turgid bladder; turgid veins.

tur·gid′i·ty, tur′gid·ness n.
tur′gid·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tu·mid

(tū'mid)
Swollen, as by congestion, edema, hyperemia.
Synonym(s): turgid.
[L. tumidus]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

turgid

Swollen and congested.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 2--Environmental pollution parameters regarding pellets stability and phosphorus leaching obtained during the different exposure times of the experimental diets*: Electrical conductivity of water (C), turgidity of pellets (T), mineral matter leaching (MmL), flotation of pellets (F), and total phosphorus leaching (PL).
The importance of maintaining the turgidity of GL could be due to, as shown by He et al.
Findings at the cellular level are used to explain changes in turgidity within the lettuce leaves and potato slices used earlier.
[It possesses] all the features of the baroque: the turgidity, theatricality, the paradoxical exaggeration aimed at capturing attention and to stirring up maraviglia" (331).
In contrast to the turgidity of much contemporary philosophical writing, Sandel's prose is positively crystalline.
This created the paradoxical effect of a dappled, whipped-up, frenzied turgidity. His personal, flickering, decentralized composition at the time--a kind of Ah Ex allover--is often attributed to the painter's love of speed and the automobile, a canard that Jean-Louis Prat, the former director of the Fondation Maeght in Saint-Paul de Vence, repeats in his catalogue essay.
At times, though, one has to overcome the turgidity and circularity of the author's formulaic writing style in order to get to the substance of the discussion.
Although the narrative suffers at points from mild turgidity and overindulgence in references to historical colleagues, which is not enabled by an adequate subject reference index, this foray into Muggletonianism is a must-read for several reasons.
Only a small portion is stored in cells to be used for metabolism and maintaining water pressure, or turgidity. At any given time, a very small fraction of the total precipitation is tied up in the living tissues of plants and animals.
During water stress periods, the stomatal aperture was shrunken more because of the severe loss in turgidity and leaf temperature.
Isolated spores were observed with a stereoscopic microscope, their viability was estimated, considering their turgidity, color and damage, counting was carried out taking into account alive, dead and total spores.