tunneled catheter

tunneled catheter

a central venous catheter left in place for a long period so that scar tissue forms and anchors it in place.
References in periodicals archive ?
The authors cover creation of vascular access, the challenges in tunneled catheter insertion, CO2 Angiography, endovascular salvage, and many other issues related to access to hemodialysis.
Our data suggest that although there may be compelling reasons to leave a tunneled catheter in place, daily consideration should be given to the necessity of a tunneled catheter weighed against the increased risk for infection that develops in the sixth week of dwell time," Dr.
Nazarian GK, Bjarnason H, Dietz CA Jr, Bernadas CA, Hunter DW Changes in tunneled catheter tip position when a patient is upright.
The patient receives dialysis through a tunneled catheter in the left internal jugular vein.
Tunneled catheter pocket or port site abscesses necessitate removal of the device and at least 7-10 days of antimicrobial therapy
While infiltration is usually associated with peripheral catheters, this complication can occur at the insertion site of a nontunneled percutaneous catheter, the venotomy end of a tunneled catheter, and an implanted port pocket (Ingle, 1995; Mayo & Pearson, 1995).
The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a prescribed showering protocol on CRBSI rates, tunnel infection rates, and exit site infection rates in individuals undergoing incenter hemodialysis and using an HD catheter; and to evaluate the effect of not using a catheter exit site dressing on CRBSIs, tunneled catheter infections, and exit site infections.
However, with the few exceptions the increase in tunneled catheter use has seen little change in the nursing practices of these catheters.
Despite technologic advances, the risk for catheter-associated infection and obstructive complications is unchanged since the first tunneled catheter was placed in 1969 (Herbst et al; 1998).
Tunnel infections involve an extending tenderness, erythema, or induration along the subcutaneous tract of a tunneled catheter.