tungiasis


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tun·gi·a·sis

(tŭng-gī'ă-sis),
Infestation with sand fleas (Tunga penetrans).

tungiasis

[tung·gī′ə·sis]
infestation of the skin with the chigoe (Tunga penetrans). See also chigoe.

tungiasis

Infestation with the jigger flea Tunga penetrans, which burrows into the skin of the feet and grows to pea size with eggs which are then discharged.

tungiasis

infestation with tunga fleas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tungiasis in native Amerindians in Vaupes province: epidemiology, clinical aspects, treatment, and prevention.
Suelen dejar los miembros infectados hechos lo que se dice un desastre, asi que padecer la tungiasis es tan incomodo y doloroso como parece.
Tungiasis results in significant morbidity, manifesting itself in a number of symptoms such as severe local inflammation, auto-amputation of digits, deformation and loss of nails, formation of fissures and ulcers, gangrene and walking difficulties.
To evaluate the scale of this neglected problem, the study aimed to ascertain the prevalence of tungiasis in a number of rural settings in the North West Province of Cameroon.
This is a case report of a patient who developed a nodule in one foot, which upon biopsy, was diagnosed as tungiasis, a cutaneous infestation caused by a human flea.
Tungiasis is a cutaneous infestation caused by Tunga penetrans, a human flea.
In endemic areas, tungiasis is readily recognized by experienced physicians during physical examination, and further diagnostic workup is usually not required.
We examined 7 biopsies from patients with tungiasis to describe the histologic features that are consistently present.
Tungiasis, a parasitic skin disease that occurs in tropical countries, is caused by sand fleas of the genus Tunga (Insecta, Siphonaptera, Tungidae).
Although tungiasis was recognized and documented by Spanish chroniclers shortly after the arrival of Columbus in Central America in 1492 (11), the South American ancestors of the Incas distinguished this affliction from others and depicted it on clay jars, pottery, and ceramics, called huacos in Peru (12-14).
This section also includes photographs of physical findings in travelers; the photographs highlight such diseases as African tick-bite fever, chikungunya, dengue, swimmer's itch, African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, measles, tungiasis, and cutaneous larva migrans.
Tungiasis is usually considered an entomologic nuisance and does not receive much attention from healthcare professionals.