tundra


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tundra

a vegetation type typical of arctic and antarctic zones, consisting of lichens, grasses, sedges and dwarf woody plants.
References in periodicals archive ?
The polar space of the tundra and the Arctic deserts
Toyota also plans to begin producing a full-size SUV alongside the Tundra late next year at its new plant near Princeton, Indiana.
We found significant losses of carbon dioxide from the soil of the tundra," notes Michael Jones, a postdoctoral researcher in evolution, ecology, and organismal biology at Ohio State University, Columbus.
Frozen tundra holds vast amounts of carbon, and global warming is expected to cause the tundra to release large amounts of carbon dioxide.
Being on the tundra "was like walking on a living, breathing organism," Lynch observes, "and I had to confront in a new, intimidating way the most basic question for a filmmaker: where do I place the camera?
One hundred percent of the winning bid from Bowyer's Tundra during the Orange County auction will go to the Emporia Community Foundation in Bowyer's Kansas hometown.
The brawnier, more chiseled look of the Tundra presented an ideal platform for the 2015 TRD Pro off-road model.
Now Toyota is pitching the redesigned 2014 Tundra as a truck for the family guy who needs to build a tree house or a baseball field.
Tundra Semiconductor Corporation (TSX:TUN), Ottawa, a leader in System Interconnect, has announced that GE Fanuc Embedded Systems, a leading provider of embedded military and commercial solutions, has selected the Tundra Tsi148(TM) PCI/X-to-VME Interconnect Bridge.
This same sort of franticness seems to be associated with the 2007 Toyota Tundra pickup truck, at least in Detroit.
on Wednesday held a groundbreaking ceremony for the expansion of its engine plant in Alabama to produce V8 engines for the Tundra full-size pickup and Sequoia SUV.
The notion that warmer tundra ecosystems will capture additional carbon dioxide--a favorite argument among skeptics of global warming--isn't supported by new field data.