tumultus

tumultus

 [too-mul´tus]
excessive organic action or motility.

tumultus

The fourth Latin declension for an uproar, bustle, disturbance, excitement, anxiety, fear, panic—e.g., agitation. It is long retired from the working medical parlance.

tumultus

(tū-mŭl′tŭs) [L.]
Excessive or agitated activity.

tumultus cordis

Irregular heart action with palpitation.
References in periodicals archive ?
tumultus et rumor et rissa fuerunt in dicta contrata." On June 27 Francesco was witness to a peace drawn up for a similar tumult.
15, 17, laeuam parma tegit Phlegraei plena tumultus, che ricorda, congiuntamente, secondo una tecnica contaminatoria peraltro assai cara al poeta tardo, Verg.
A cautionary note: No matter how great the contributions of Yiddish have been to mainstream American English, we mustn't take credit for words that sound like they are Yiddish but really aren't--words like shush, lentil (even though it rhymes with yente), svelte (from the Italian svelto), mish-mash, and tumult which derives not from tumler but from the Latin tumultus.
1a Vacillantis trutine b Me vacare studio Libramine Vult ratio; Mens suspensa fluctuat Sed dum amor alteram Et estuat Vult operam Et tumultus anxios In diversa rapior.
veteres tranquilla tumultus mens horret, relegensque alium putat ista locutum.
Furthermore, the meaning of the phrase which adorns the title page of the 1607 and 1611 Certaine Small Workes--"AEtas prima canat veneres postrema tumultus" ("let the first age sing of love, the latter of confusion")--suggests that, although he views his own era as diminished in comparison to the golden age of the classical past, he sees himself as writing within the classical literary tradition still, if only of disorder and confusion.
Oberman"; Christopher Ocker, "Religious Reform and Social Cohesion in Late Medieval Germany"; Peter Blickle, "Tumultus rusticorum: A Nightmare of Art"; Andrew Pettegree, "Protestant Printing during the French Wars of Religion: The Lyon Press of Jean Saugrain"; William J.
(3.) One further example is Tacitus, Histories 1.40.1, `non tumultus, non quies, quale magni metus et magnae irae silentium est', `there was neither uproar, nor silence, but the sort of hush which is typical of great fear or great anger', and Naevius, Bellum Punticum fragment 57 in Strzelecki, op.
Of course, it remains possible that Fabius had in mind a more politically charged Latin word such as seditio or tumultus. But we can only judge from the evidence before us, and the word used in the letter need not imply mass or popular revolt.
On notera aussi qu'a partir du Ve s., des grammairiens comme Pocas (34), Priscien (35) et plus tard l'Ars Bernensis (36) (ca 750) retissent les liens qui unissent les incorporels (res incorporales) et les verbes, dans une perspective orthographique de classement des noms en fonction de leur origine verbale: ils font ainsi apparaitre que les incorporels des differentes declinaisons sont generalement des noms de processus, comme en temoignent tous les exemples evoques, oratio, ratio, actio, statio, hortatio, religio pour Phocas, risus, visus, tumultus, metus, luxus, sexus, portus, artus, arcus, lacus, vultus, cultus, iudicatus, monitus, habitus, auditus pour Priscien, puisque ces substantifs sont mentionnes comme derivant de verbes.
Marie Majoris, magna controversia, arque, tumultus circa funeralium supellectiles, ita ut omnes ad eas dirigiendas properabant" (268).
neque populi aut plebis ulla vox, sed attoniti voltus et conversae ad omnia aures; non tumultus, non quies, quale magni metus et magnae irae silentium est.