tumor seeding

tumor seeding

The spillage of tumor cell clusters and their subsequent growth as malignant implants at a site adjacent to an original tumor. See Tumor implant.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tumor seeding

The spread of cancer cells to neighboring tissues, e.g., along the course of a biopsy needle or via a laparoscope.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
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Therefore, although there is a risk of tumor seeding, EUS-FNA should be considered an important modality for pathological diagnoses for small pancreatic masses.
Using a laparoscopic stapler may result in positive surgical margin in the bladder; the transvesical laparoscopic approach, while oncologically reliable, has technical difficulties;and the transurethral approach and intussusception carry the risk of tumor seeding. The long-term follow-up results for robotassisted distal ureterectomy are still insufficient.
FNA can lead to tumor seeding and potentially cause parathyromatosis.
Furthermore, EFTR required the creation of a pseudoperforation, which can increase the risk of intraperitoneal tumor seeding when the pseudocapsule is not intact.
Furthermore, endoscopic biopsy might also result in tumor seeding. Therefore, it is difficult to discriminate the two diseases by using endoscopic biopsy for its' own limitations; in this current study, we did not adopt the endoscopic biopsy.
However, there is a theoretical risk of tumor seeding along the biopsy tract following transthoracic procedures, and indeed there is at least one such case report for SFT (29).
HCCs seem to be particularly prone to tumor seeding after biopsy with an incidence of 2% to 5% [28, 29].
Vitagliano, "Port site metastasis and tumor seeding in oncologic laparoscopic urology," Urology, vol.
The result was reported as two tumor nodules in the liver, the larger one of 9.2 cm in size and the smaller one of 0.4 cm in size with tumor seeding of 11.5 cm in the anterior abdominal wall, and a clean surgical border (Fig.3).
The biggest limitation of subconjunctival chemotherapy is ineffective control of subretinal tumor seeding. Side effects include periorbital edema and cellulitis, orbital adipose tissue atrophy, fibrosis of extraocular muscles and Tenon's capsule, and subsequent limitations to ocular motility.