tumor burden

tu·mor bur·den

the total mass of tumor tissue carried by a patient with a malignancy.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tu·mor bur·den

(tū'mŏr bŭr'dĕn)
The total mass of tumor tissue carried by a patient with cancer.
Synonym(s): tumour burden.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

tumor burden

The sum of cancer cells present in the body.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The Company's lead drug candidate, CRV431, reduces liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma tumor burden in experimental models of NASH.
This includes results from the REFLECTIONS B3281006 clinical comparative study, which evaluated the efficacy, safety and immunogenicity, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of RUXIENCE and found no clinically meaningful differences in safety or efficacy compared to the reference product in patients with CD20-positive, low tumor burden follicular lymphoma.
"Reduction of tumor burden and increased cancer cell death was observed in all patients, and removed all trace of the disease in one patient following just one week of treatment, showing its potential effectiveness," Pandha said, adding, "Notably, no significant side-effects were observed in any patient."
Reduction of tumor burden and increased cancer cell death was observed in all patients and removed all trace of the disease in one patient following just one week of treatment, showing its potential effectiveness.
aBSI permits a faster quantitative assessment of tumor burden and is highly reproducible.
The company utilises this biomarker to monitor the tumor burden and predict the therapeutic outcome of multiple myeloma patients.
Studies have reported differences of SUV-based variables and metabolic tumor burden in breast cancer (2, 3, 13).
MRD is a general measure of the amount of cancer in the body (tumor burden), specifically the number of cancer cells that remain in a person's bone marrow, either during or after treatment.
(5) In many cases, the large tumor burden can also result in chronic compressive atelectasis and, therefore, postoperative expansion edema is a known complication.
Wu et al .[21] analyzed serum LDH, thymidine kinase, CRP, and [sz]2-microglobulin correlation with both whole-body metabolic tumor volume and metabolic tumor burden. They found that these serum tumor markers could be clinically useful in malignant NHL because they are widely available and inexpensive.