tuition fees

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tuition fees

A fee paid to an institution for instruction. In common parlance, tuition fees are those paid to a university or professional school. Tuition fees were introduced by the government in 1998 for students entering higher education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the education ministry remains firm, saying it will not allow any universities to raise tuition this year.
Free tuition will benefit the rich, but freeing educational expenses, such as tuition, gives monumental relief to the poor,' he says.
Without the tuition increase, UO leaders said university officials would be forced to make $6 million in budget cuts for 2017-18.
With the passage of time and its growing demand, the private tuition has emerged as a large scale business industry in several regions comprising a variety of socio-culturally diverse countries (Aslam, 2011; ESP, 2006; Bray, Mazawi and Sultana, 2013; Silova, 2009).
House Higher Education Chairman John Zerwas, R-Richmond, said he thinks there's probably too little time to find a way to turn tuition limitations into law.
Faced with the prospect of protests if they try to raise the tuition fees, the administrators impose many "other fees" for all sorts of unexplained purposes.
The private tuition industry has also some economic implications on students their families and the overall society.
A prepaid tuition plan is a contract that delivers a promised set of tuition benefits between parents and a state's prepaid tuition program, allowing them to buy tuition for a child at a set price, either in full or in installments, says Joe Hurley, founder of SavingforCollege.
Wyoming tuition currently is about 66 percent compared to colleges in surrounding states, according to commission staff.
The tuition centers can be found in every nook and corner of the twin cities claiming 'money back guarantee'.
Beall's measure would guarantee students a financial benefit equivalent to the amount of tuition purchased.
Enrollment at the college had been steadily declining, and tuition costs were relatively high for a two-year school.