tubular necrosis


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Acute Tubular Necrosis

A condition characterised by acute renal failure with oliguria, which returns to normal in days to weeks, with the caveat that 50% of patients die.
Aetiology Ischaemia—medical, obstetric, surgical, including transplantation (cold ischaemia); toxicity—drugs (aminoglycosides, amphotericin B, cyclosporine), chemicals (radiocontrast), pigments (myoglobin—crush syndrome, haemoglobinuria), sepsis, shock. Predisposing conditions Diabetes, liver disease, immunosuppression by toxic agents.
Management It is managed in transplanted kidneys in an expectant fashion as renal function may resume spontaneously in 2 to 4 weeks.

tubular necrosis

See Acute tubular necrosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
acute rejection, acute tubular necrosis and nephrotoxicity, B-mode ultrasound presentation can be identical (5).
Acute tubular necrosis is the most common renal AKI seen in lymphoma patients, with lysozyme-induced tubular necrosis and tumour lysis syndrome being common etiologies (Luciano & Brewster, 2014).
Holers, "Acute tubular necrosis is characterized by activation of the alternative pathway of complement," Kidney International, vol.
HP treatment could significantly reduce the tubular necrosis score dose-dependently when compared to cisplatin-treated mice alone (Figure 3(f)).
This showed acute tubular necrosis and significant deposition of hemosiderin, as shown by positive Perls staining.
reported a case of acute tubular necrosis (ATN), developing secondary to the topical use of vitamin-D in a psoriatic patient [25].
Histologic examination of sections indicated extensive tubular necrosis in the kidneys of ischemic mice compared with those of sham-operated mice (Figure 7(b)).
Tubulointerstitial injuries accounted for a total of 313 of the lesions (45.7%), with acute tubular necrosis predominating (144).
Nephrology literature suggests that a urine sediment "score" (Figure 1) consisting of the number of renal tubular epithelial cells per high power field and granular casts per low power field can be used to differentiate hospital-acquired AKI from acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and acute renal failure caused by a sudden reduction in blood flow to the kidney (pre-renal AKI).
The two major causes of AKI developing in the hospital are prerenal disease and acute tubular necrosis (ATN).
It is known to contribute to hypertension, proteinuria, renal tubular necrosis, renal failure, and many other dysfunctions.