tubular adenoma


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tu·bu·lar ad·e·no·ma

1. a benign neoplasm composed of epithelial tissue resembling a tubular gland.
2. dysplastic polyp of the colonic mucosa that is considered a potential precursor of adenocarcinoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Distribution of Identified Colorectal lesions Tubular adenomas 81.
Six of these lesions were tubular adenomas, one with atypia, and two were tubular villous adenomas, one with atypia (Table 2).
142) The unique immunostaining patterns of p53 and Ki-67 are significant for differentiating the dysplastic lesions in IBD (Figure 3, B, C, E, and F) from a sporadic tubular adenoma (Figure 3, H and I).
CRC typically arises from polyps known as adenomas, ranging from small tubular adenomas to more dangerous tubulovillous and villous adenomas and adenomas with high-grade dysplasia (cells that more closely resemble cancer).
The remaining are adenomas, most of which are small tubular adenomas (less than one centimeter) that can become cancerous if left untreated.
3) Progression from conventional adenomas to adenocarcinoma is associated with mutations in genes of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway, in particular in KRAS, which was reported in up to 18% of tubular adenomas and 50% of villous adenomas.
Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer and the American Cancer Society, patients with two or fewer small (less than 1 cm) tubular adenomas with only low-grade dysplasia should have their next follow-up colonoscopy in 5-10 years.
Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer and the American Cancer Society, patients with two or fewer small (less than 1-cm) tubular adenomas with only low-grade dysplasia should have their next follow-up colonoscopy in 5-10 years.
8) Traditional serrated adenomas, hyperplastic polyps, and tubular adenomas were not included in this study.
Lieberman noted that more than 50% of endoscopists are recommending more frequent surveillance than expert guidelines recommend for patients with a low recurrence risk, including those with small tubular adenomas.
Of the recurrent neoplasms detected in the 3-year follow-up group, 79% were tubular adenomas, as were 80% of those found with 5-year surveillance.
A multivariate analysis that controlled for smoking, age, and other potentially confounding factors explored differences in significant colorectal neoplasia (villous tissue, high-grade dysplasia, large tubular adenomas, or more than two adenomas of any size) in 68 regular white-wine drinkers, 176 regular red-wine drinkers, and 1,381 abstainers (or infrequent wine drinkers).