tube worm

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tube worm

any POLYCHAETE worm that lives in a tube. Tube worms are mainly sedentary.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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Biometry of the branchial plume in the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Riftia pachyptila (Vestimentifera; Annelida).
formidabilis would usually inhabit was exposed to high wave action, a characteristic that appears to have driven the spider to nest behind tubeworm conglomerates, mussel beds or barnacles at other sites.
The most interesting aspects of the site, said Levin, "are the presence of vent-like and seep-like features together, a vast cover of tubeworms across large areas, and a wealth of new species."
After using a robotic arm to lift the tubeworm from a hole on the seabed, oil gushed out and they discovered it was consuming chemicals from the decomposing oil.
Ninety-eight percent of the noncolonial organisms identified in photographs belonged to five extremely abundant taxa: Spirorbis spp., the tubeworm Protula tubularia, the jingle shells Anomia spp., the barnacles Balanus spp., and an unidentified species of burrowing anemones (order Ceriantharia).
One conclusion: A tubeworm at a hydrocarbon seep takes between 170 and 250 years to grow 6.5 feet long.
Expression and localization of carbonic anhydrase and ATPases in the symbiotic tubeworm Riftia pachyptila.
The area was between 50 and 80 metres offshore, past a number of rocks in the shallow intertidal zone that exhibit heavy coverage of the calcareous tubeworm Galeolaria caespitosa, and also features an intertidal seagrass meadow.
(24) Turbulent flow channels based on Schultz's design (25) have also been employed in foul-release assessment of surfaces that were inoculated with marine algae (e.g., Viva) or macro-invertebrates such as barnacle, ascidian, bryozoan, and tubeworm settlement (26,27) and assessed for removal.
Effects of oyster farming on macrofaunal assemblages associated with Lanice conchilega tubeworm populations: a trophic analysis using natural stable isotopes.
To survive, each young tubeworm must acquire a new energy source, a live-in colony of bacteria that capture energy from sulfur-spewing vents and other deep-sea chemical bonanzas.
But researchers from Penn State University may have discovered the animal kingdom's champ of longevity (length of life)--a species of tubeworm that lives 250 years!