tuberous xanthoma

tuberous xanthoma

References in classic literature ?
It is needless to say that Rebecca irritated her aunt with every breath she drew.
For the first time Genevieve saw the stomach-breathing of a man, an abdomen that rose and fell far more with every breath than her breast rose and fell after she had run for a car.
The stumps in the cleared fields were already hidden beneath the wheat that was waving with every breath of the sum mer air, shining and changing its hues like velvet.
With every breath of air that stirred among those branches in the sunshine, some trembling, changing light, would fall upon her grave.
So there was no damming up the tide of life that was rising within him--rising with every mouthful of meat he swallowed, with every breath he drew.
She remained not less pale than ever; but the birthmark with every breath that came and went, lost somewhat of its former distinctness.
But in his handsome, unmoved face I read my fate and death-warrant; and with every breath I cursed my folly and my cowardice in coming to him at all.
Tuberous xanthoma are large plaque like lesions of the subcutis usually located on the buttocks, elbows, knees and fingers and seen with type IIa or III hyperlipoproteinemia.
Tuberous xanthomas or xanthelasmas are waxy-appearing growths that may look yellow or orange and appear to be pasted on the skin in areas around the face, commonly the eyelids.
The patient's physical examination revealed tendinous and tuberous xanthomas [Figures 3 & 4], stria palmaris and arcus juveniles.
When the disease does manifest, patients typically develop palmar xanthomas, which appear as a yellowish discoloration of the hand and finger creases, and tuberous xanthomas, which are bulbous cutaneous growths located on the elbows and knees.
10) TABLE 2 Primary hyperlipidemia Genetic disorder (Frederickson type) Typical clinical findings Familial lipoprotein lipase Eruptive xanthomas, deficiency (type I) hepatosplenomegaly, pancreatitis Familial apoprotein C-II Eruptive xanthomas, deficiency (type I) hepatosplenomegaly, pancreatitis Familial combined Coronary or peripheral hyperlipidemia (type IIb) atherosclerosis Familial Palmar and tuberous xanthomas, dysbetalipoproteinemia (type coronary or peripheral III) atherosclerosis Familial hypertriglyceridemia Eruptive xanthomas (type V) (type IV or V) Adapted from: Rader DJ, Hobbs HH.