tubercle


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

tubercle

 [too´ber-k'l]
1. a nodule or small eminence, especially one on a bone, for attachment of a tendon; see also tuber and tuberosity. Called also tuberculum. adj., adj tuber´cular, tuber´culate.
2. a small, rounded nodule produced by the bacillus of tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis). It is made up of small spherical cells that contain giant cells and are surrounded by spindle-shaped epithelioid cells.
fibrous tubercle a tubercle of bacillary origin that contains connective tissue elements.
Ghon tubercle Ghon focus.
mental tubercle a prominence on the inner border of either side of the mental protuberance of the mandible.
miliary tubercle one of the many minute tubercles formed in many organs in acute miliary tuberculosis.
pubic tubercle a prominent tubercle at the lateral end of the pubic crest.
supraglenoid tubercle one on the scapula for attachment of the long head of the biceps muscle.

tu·ber·cle

(tū'bĕr-kĕl),
1. A nodule, especially in an anatomic, not pathologic, sense.
2. A circumscribed, rounded, solid elevation on the skin, mucous membrane, surface of an organ, or the surface of a bone, the latter giving attachment to a muscle or ligament.
3. dentistry a small elevation arising on the surface of a tooth. Synonym(s): tuberculum [TA]
4. A granulomatous lesion due to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although somewhat variable in size (0.5-3 mm in diameter) and in the proportions of various histologic components, tubercle's tend to be fairly well circumscribed, spheroid, firm lesions that usually consist of three irregularly outlined but moderately distinct zones: 1) an inner focus of necrosis, coagulative at first, which then becomes caseous; 2) a middle zone that consists of a fairly dense accumulation of large mononuclear phagocytes (macrophages), frequently arranged somewhat radially (with reference to the necrotic material) resembling an epithelium, and hence termed epithelioid cells; multinucleated giant cells of Langhans type may also be present; and 3) an outer zone of numerous lymphocytes, and a few monocytes and plasma cells. In instances in which healing has begun, a fourth zone of fibrous tissue may form at the periphery. Morphologically indistinguishable lesions may occur in diseases caused by other agents; many observers use the term nonspecifically, that is, with reference to any such granuloma; other clinicians use tubercle only for tuberculous lesions, and then designate those of undetermined causes as epithelioid-cell granulomas.
[L. tuberculum, dim. of tuber, a knob, a swelling, a tumor]

tubercle

(to͞o′bər-kəl)
n.
1. An anatomical nodule.
2. A small elevation on the surface of a tooth.
3. A nodule or swelling, especially a mass of lymphocytes and epithelioid cells forming the characteristic granulomatous lesion of tuberculosis.

tubercle

Medtalk Bump, lump, nodule, protuberance, especially on a bone

tu·ber·cle

(tū'bĕr-kĕl)
1. A nodule, especially in an anatomic, not pathologic, sense.
Synonym(s): tuberculum (1) [TA] .
2. A circumscribed, rounded, solid elevation on the skin, mucous membrane, or surface of an organ.
3. A slight elevation from the surface of a bone giving attachment to a muscle or ligament.
4. dentistry A small elevation arising on the surface of a tooth.
5. A granulomatous lesion due to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although somewhat variable in size (0.5-3 mm in diameter) and in the proportions of various histologic components, tubercles tend to be fairly well-circumscribed, spheroid, firm lesions that usually consist of three zones: 1) an inner focus of necrosis, coagulative at first and then becoming caseous; 2) a middle zone that consists of large mononuclear phagocytes (macrophages), frequently arranged somewhat radially (with reference to the necrotic material), resembling an epithelium and hence termed epithelioid cells; multinucleated giant cells of Langhans type may also be present; and 3) an outer zone of numerous lymphocytes and a few monocytes and plasma cells. In instances in which healing has begun, a fourth zone of fibrous tissue may form at the periphery. Morphologically indistinguishable lesions may occur in diseases caused by other agents; many observers use the term nonspecifically, i.e., with reference to any such granuloma; others use "tubercle" only for tuberculous lesions and designate those of undetermined causes as epithelioid-cell granulomas.
[L. tuberculum, dim. of tuber, a knob, a swelling, a tumor]

tubercle

1. A small nodular mass of tubercular tissue.
2. An informal term for TUBERCULOSIS.
3. Any small, rounded protrusion on a bone.

tubercle

a spherical or ovoid swelling.

tu·ber·cle

(tū'bĕr-kĕl)
1. [TA] In dentistry, a small elevation arising on the surface of a tooth.
2. [TA] A nodule, especially in an anatomic, not pathologic, sense.
3. Circumscribed, rounded, solid elevation on skin, mucous membrane, surface of an organ, or bone surface, the last giving attachment to a muscle or ligament.
4. A granulomatous lesion due to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
[L. tuberculum, dim. of tuber, a knob, a swelling, a tumor]
References in periodicals archive ?
Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis (EPTB)--EPTB results from hematogenous dissemination of tubercle bacilli to various organs other than lung.
SON: supraorbital notch; MC: metoptic canal; OC: optic canal; SOF: superior orbital fissure; WT: Whitnall's tubercle; FZS: frontozygomatic suture.
Diagnosis.--Pair of parallel tubercles present on eye mound (pair of divergent spines in A.
The TF was located at (33.3%, Figure 1a) or posterior to (66.7%, Figure 1b) the oblique line and below the superior tubercle in all nine sides.
Based on the results of this study, we suggest that during the practice of chemical neurolysis treatment to thigh adductor muscles spasticity, one could measure on body surface the length between greater trochanter of femur and pubic tubercle (H line), and the length from greater trochanter of femur to lateral epicondyle of femur (L line).
However, it was verified difference in the measurements of the eggs of Trinidad and Florida, when compared to Brazil in relation to the lenght, width and characteristics of the tubercles being the samples of Brazil the most disparate, thus contributing to inter- and intraspecific taxonomy of Culicidae species.
Recommended prophylactic treatments include selective grinding of the tubercles to allow the formation of reparative dentine avoiding pulp exposure; the application of resin to reinforce the tubercles; if the tubercle was accidentally fractured and dentine is exposed, the placement of cavity liners prior to resin composite, or cavity preparations followed by partial pulpotomy procedures are considered as possible treatment options (2, 27-30).
A healthy 11-year-old girl was presented to the National University of Malaysia (UKM) Paediatric Dental Clinic with a referral for further management of pulp necrosis of an immature lower right second premolar (tooth 45), secondary to the fractured tubercle of dens evaginatus.
If a tubercle of low echo, irregular form, unclear border, and calcification is found, the possibility of thyroid cancer should be considered.
Tibial tubercle avulsion fractures are managed operatively in most cases, and long-term outcomes are favorable with the resumption of sport to the previous level [4].
Tubercle Number of setae Types of setae Cephalic chaetotaxy--dorsal side Cl 4 Ml Mc Af 6-7 Ml Mc me Oc 1 Ml (Di + De) 2 Ml or Mc (DL + L + So) 11 Ml, Mc, me Cephalic chaetotaxy--ventral side Vi 5 -- Vea 3 -- Vem 2-3 -- Vep 3 -- Labium 6, 0x -- Tubercle Names of setae Cephalic chaetotaxy--dorsal side Cl F G Af B A, O D Oc Ocm (Di + De) Di1, De1 (DL + L + So) not recognizable Cephalic chaetotaxy--ventral side Vi -- Vea -- Vem -- Vep -- Labium -- Table 2.