tryptophan

(redirected from tryptophane)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

tryptophan

 [trip´to-fan]
a naturally occurring amino acid, one of the essential amino acids; it is a precursor of serotonin. Adequate levels in the diet may mitigate pellagra by compensating for deficiencies of niacin.

tryp·to·phan (Trp, W),

(trip'tō-fan),
2-Amino-3-(3-indolyl)propionic acid; the l-isomer is a component of proteins; a nutritionally essential amino acid.

tryptophan

(trĭp′tə-făn′) also

tryptophane

(-fān′)
n.
An essential amino acid, C11H12N2O2, formed from proteins during digestion by the action of proteolytic enzymes. It is necessary for normal growth and development and is the precursor of several substances, including serotonin and niacin.

tryptophan

An essential amino acid, which is a key building block in protein biosynthesis. It is a precursor for serotonin (a neurotransmitter) and niacin (a B vitamin).

Dietary sources
Milk, sesame seeds, soy beans, spirulina, sunflower seeds, cashews.
 
Fringe nutrition
Tryptophan has been promoted for its alleged ability to induce sleep, and as an antidepressint.

tryp·to·phan

(W) (trip'tŏ-fan)
A nutritionally essential amino acid; the l-isomer is a component of proteins.

tryptophan

An antidepressant drug. L-tryptophan, sold in USA as a non-prescription food additive was withdrawn by the American Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) because of reports of a severe muscle disorder apparently caused by an unidentified contaminant. It is used only by hospital specialists who are aware of the risks. A brand name is Optimax.
Tryptophanclick for a larger image
Fig. 306 Tryptophan . Molecular structure.

tryptophan (W, Trp)

one of 20 AMINO ACIDS common in protein. It has a nonpolar ‘R’ group structure and is relatively insoluble in water. See Fig. 306 . The ISOELECTRIC POINT of tryptophan is 5.9.

Tryptophan

An essential amino acid that has to consumed in the diet because it cannot be manufactured by the body. Tryptophan is converted by the body to niacin, one of the B vitamins.
Mentioned in: Hartnup Disease

tryp·to·phan

(Trp, W) (trip'tŏ-fan)
A nutritionally essential amino acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
On tryosine and tryptophane determination in proteins.
Both milk and cream, whether 'au naturel' or vegetable product contain significant amounts of Tryptophane, an amino acid which promotes sleep.
The reasons for best FCR with the 75% replacement level may be due to a more optimal supply of essential amino acid profile (particularly tryptophane), nutrient digestibility and an increased rate of protein accumulation (Khan et al., 2015).
Moreover, micronutrients activate several enzymes (catalase, carbonic dehydrogenize, tryptophane synthates etc.) and involved various physiological activities.
Taking into account special medico-biological significance of free amino acids in functional products, researchers estimated the degree of impact of L-amino acids mix (leucine, isoleucine, valine, arginine, lysine, threonine, tryptophane, histidine, alanine, proline, serine, glycine) together with bacterial agent PBK-BR on uncooked smoked sausages, as well as impact of hydrolysates of hydrobionts and starter culture PB-MP on the quantitative content of free amino acids in restructured ham products.
Nyc, "Kynurenine as an intermediate in the formation of nicotinic acid from tryptophane by neurospora," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol.
Effects of tyrosine and tryptophane ingestion on plasma catecholamine and 3, 4,-di hydroxyphenylacetic acid concentrations.
The peptide concentration was determined spectrophotometrically at 280 nm using an extinction coefficient of 5500 [M.sup.-1] [cm.sup.-1] (Pace et al., 1995) for both tryptophane containing peptides and confirmed by amino acid analysis after acid hydrolysis.
The biochemical reactions tested with API test are: production of indole; utilization of citrate; production of nitrite; fermentations of glucose, mannitol, inositol, sorbitol, rhamnose, sucrose, melibiose, amygdaline, and arabinose; production of [H.sub.2]S; activities of beta-galactosidase, tryptophane desaminase, gelatinase, arginine dihydrolase, lysine decarboxylase, and ornithine decorboxylase; formation of acetoin from pyruvate and oxidase (MacDonell et al.