tryptophan


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Related to tryptophan: L-tryptophan

tryptophan

 [trip´to-fan]
a naturally occurring amino acid, one of the essential amino acids; it is a precursor of serotonin. Adequate levels in the diet may mitigate pellagra by compensating for deficiencies of niacin.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tryp·to·phan (Trp, W),

(trip'tō-fan),
2-Amino-3-(3-indolyl)propionic acid; the l-isomer is a component of proteins; a nutritionally essential amino acid.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tryptophan

(trĭp′tə-făn′) also

tryptophane

(-fān′)
n.
An essential amino acid, C11H12N2O2, formed from proteins during digestion by the action of proteolytic enzymes. It is necessary for normal growth and development and is the precursor of several substances, including serotonin and niacin.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tryptophan

An essential amino acid, which is a key building block in protein biosynthesis. It is a precursor for serotonin (a neurotransmitter) and niacin (a B vitamin).

Dietary sources
Milk, sesame seeds, soy beans, spirulina, sunflower seeds, cashews.
 
Fringe nutrition
Tryptophan has been promoted for its alleged ability to induce sleep, and as an antidepressint.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

tryp·to·phan

(W) (trip'tŏ-fan)
A nutritionally essential amino acid; the l-isomer is a component of proteins.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

tryptophan

An antidepressant drug. L-tryptophan, sold in USA as a non-prescription food additive was withdrawn by the American Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) because of reports of a severe muscle disorder apparently caused by an unidentified contaminant. It is used only by hospital specialists who are aware of the risks. A brand name is Optimax.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
Tryptophanclick for a larger image
Fig. 306 Tryptophan . Molecular structure.

tryptophan (W, Trp)

one of 20 AMINO ACIDS common in protein. It has a nonpolar ‘R’ group structure and is relatively insoluble in water. See Fig. 306 . The ISOELECTRIC POINT of tryptophan is 5.9.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Tryptophan

An essential amino acid that has to consumed in the diet because it cannot be manufactured by the body. Tryptophan is converted by the body to niacin, one of the B vitamins.
Mentioned in: Hartnup Disease
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

tryp·to·phan

(Trp, W) (trip'tŏ-fan)
A nutritionally essential amino acid.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The liver also regulates circulating tryptophan levels by synthesizing NA[D.sup.+] from dietary tryptophan; in the periphery, cells cannot synthesize NA[D.sup.+] but can recycle metabolized NA[D.sup.+] with the enzyme nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT; nicotinamide ribonucleotide).
Pulses, beans and lentils also contain high amounts of tryptophan and B vitamins.
A key co-factor for the enzymes that metabolize tryptophan into serotonin and melatonin is vitamin B (6).
For one, the mean rate of serotonin synthesis is 52% higher in normal males than normal females, giving them a greater buffer when dietary intake of tryptophan is low.
Harriman, "Further comments on the redox potentials of tryptophan and tyrosine," The Journal of Physical Chemistry, vol.
Alcohol impairs the transport of tryptophan into the brain, where it's needed to make melatonin.
Further, when tryptophan was doubled in the mice's feed, the number of such cells rose by about 50 per cent.
"The more tryptophan the mice had in their diet, the more of these immune cells they had."
And foods high in tryptophan help us produce serotonin, the relaxing and calming brain chemical.
Tryptophan (Trp), an essential amino acid, constitutes a central component in human and animal protein synthesis, and it serves as the sole source of substrates that facilitate the generation of a range of crucial molecules.