tryptamine


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Related to tryptamine: tryptophan, DMT, dimethyltryptamine

tryptamine

 [trip´tah-mēn]
a chemical product of the decarboxylation of tryptophan, causing vasoconstriction by the release of norepinephrine at postganglionic nerve endings.

trypt·a·mine

(trip'tă-mēn, -min),
A decarboxylation product of l-tryptophan that occurs in plants and certain foods (for example, cheese). It raises the blood pressure through vasoconstrictor action, by the release of norepinephrine at postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings, and is believed to be one of the agents responsible for hypertensive episodes after therapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (for example, pargyline hydrochloride).

tryptamine

(trĭp′tə-mēn′)
n.
1. A crystalline substance, C10H12N2, that is formed in plant and animal tissues from tryptophan and is an intermediate in various metabolic processes.
2. Any of various naturally occurring or synthetic derivatives of this compound, many of which have psychoactive properties.

tryp·ta·mine

(trip'tă-mēn, -min)
A decarboxylation product of l-tryptophan that occurs in plants and certain foods. It raises the blood pressure through vasoconstrictor action, by the release of norepinephrine at postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings, and is believed to be one of the agents responsible for hypertensive episodes after therapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Strassman (2001), although tissues and organs like the lungs, liver, blood, and eyes all have the enzymes and the biochemical machinery necessary to convert tryptamine to DMT, the pineal gland is particularly rich in them and also has a high amount of serotonin ready to convert to tryptamine: the so-called pineal-DMT hypothesis (Cardena et al., 2015).
The fresh 3,5-dinitro benzoylchloride (2.30 g, 0.01 mol) dissolved in 10 mL of C[H.sub.2][Cl.sub.2] (MDC) was added dropwise to a solution containing a mixture of tryptamine (1.60 g, 0.01 mol) and triethylamine (5.0 mL) in 20 mL of C[H.sub.2][Cl.sub.2] in an ice bath.
Carvalho, "The hallucinogenic world of tryptamines: an updated review," Archives of Toxicology, vol.
caapi with the leaves of Psychotria viridis (Figure 1) or from the vine Diplopterys cabrerana, that contain the tryptamine hallucinogen dimethyltryptamine (DMT) (Figure 2).
These hallucinogenic properties are attributed to the presence of tryptamine derived alkaloids, such as N, N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), which are found in large quantities in Mimosa tenuiflora (syn.
Eight biogenic amines were investigated on wines, according to standards of putrescine (PUT) dihydrochloride, spermidine (SPD) trihydrochloride, spermine (SPM) tetrahydrochloride, agmatine (AGM) sulfate, cadaverine (CAD) dihydrochloride, serotonine (SRT) hydrochloride, histamine (HIM) dihydrochloride, tyramine (TYM), tryptamine (TRM) and 2-phenylethylamine (PHM) dihydrochloride purchased from Sigma Chemical Co.
Standards, namely, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, and tyramine, were obtained from Sigma.
The expression of our candidate genes could be modulated mainly by 3 molecules: 5-hydroxy tryptamine (for HTR1B and SLC6A4), PRL (HTR2A and HTR2C), and HSP90AB1 (for SL6CA4).
Except for the fact that the content of tryptamine in the sample with Monascus anka mash was higher, the amine concentrations for all treatments were lower than those of other fermented meat products.
Hundreds of thousands of people are undergoing the uncanny initiation into the tryptamine zone that is afforded by ayahuasca, vaporised or smoked DMT, 5-MeO-DMT and other substances.
Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxy tryptamine, MT) is a hormone with an endolamine structure, which is produced in the pineal gland and other organs from the tryptophan.