trustee

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trustee

A person entrusted to perform a particular task.

trustee

Vox populi A person entrusted to perform a particular task. See Health information.
References in periodicals archive ?
s role in achieving peace and stability in war-torn and failing states through trusteeship will be circumscribed if the problem of authority creep is not remedied, or at least managed.
must play the central role in any attempt to manage or reverse state failure, and that some form of trusteeship is likely to emerge as a template for doing so.
s operational efficacy and flexibility as well as its political credibility with key actors in weak and failing states, thus potentially strengthening trusteeship as a sustainable tool for managing state failure.
s recent deployment of transitional administrations flows from its long history in temporary governance, from trusteeship to complex peacekeeping operations.
In its most basic outlines, the Trusteeship Agreement would have instituted a secular and democratic model of government in all the geographic area of former mandate Palestine.
Review of the Trusteeship Agreement, then, is not mere hypothetical speculation about what "might have been" or an idle exercise in "rewriting history" for purely conjectural reasons.
Do the legal norms incorporated into the 1948 UN Trusteeship Agreement for Palestine offer any guidelines or benchmarks that could be used in mapping out a solution to the Palestinian refugee question today?
proposal for the Trusteeship Agreement will be presented.
This notion of responsibility gave the concept of trusteeship an added purpose, moving it away from a simple paternalism to something that connects the moral responsibilities of the colonial powers.
While the mandates formally collapsed after World War II, the United Nations institutionalized an alternative model with the Trusteeship Council, which formally disbanded only in 1994 when the last UN territory, Palau, became independent.
As Bain demonstrates, however, the ideas underlying trusteeship continue to inform international politics, especially in the various UN missions that have engaged in peace building or attempts to create institutions of governance in areas torn by civil war.
With his sympathetic presentation of the idea of trusteeship, and by highlighting the links between trusteeship and peace building efforts, Bain surprised this reader by concluding with a forceful condemnation of the practice in his final chapter.