trustee

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trustee

A person entrusted to perform a particular task.

trustee

Vox populi A person entrusted to perform a particular task. See Health information.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sarah Swift, continued: The role played by professional trustees is extremely important with more and more schemes relying upon them.
Although the Trustees assumption of the role of permanent trustee occurred on June 30, 2011, more than two years from the order for relief, the Bankruptcy Court considered the Trustee's earlier appointment as interim trustee on May 13, 2011 as the event that triggered the additional one-year extension of the statute of limitations, thereby rendering the actions timely commenced.
Trustee investment duties When trustees invest assets, they are under a duty to take such care as an ordinary prudent man would take if he was making an investment for the benefit of others for whom he felt morally bound to provide.
A Special Needs Trust gives the Trustee enormous power to help--or not help--your child.
The state required the district to hire a trustee through the Los Angeles County Office of Education.
Just as passengers would not want an airline's chief financial officer to fly the airplane, hospital trustees want the care-delivery agenda piloted by those who understand it best.
The other old rule carried over to the new regulations allows a trustee to include capital gain in DNI if the trust instrument directs the trustee to distribute the sale proceeds of certain assets (i.
Trustees and their advisers should always keep potential adjustments and unitrust conversions in mind as ways to treat all trust beneficiaries fairly and avoid litigation.
Trustees must be consulted and, crucially, are expected to negotiate increased funding in return for their approval to the dividend payment.
The electorate bought the sell that new trustees would provide great team work and the whole system would get along fine as long as the trustees rubber-stamped the Administration's proposals.
Annette Conklin, chair, 2001-2003, and trustee, 1998-2003
When you set up a trust, you make a legal arrangement that gives a trustee power to hold your trust's assets for the benefit of someone else -- your beneficiary.