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truss

 [trus]
an elastic, canvas, or metallic device for retaining a reduced hernia within the abdominal cavity.

truss

(trŭs),
An appliance designed to prevent the return of a reduced hernia or the increase in size of a hernia; it consists of a pad attached to a belt and kept in place by a spring or straps.
[Fr. trousser, to tie up, to pack]

truss

(trus) an elastic, canvas, or metallic device for retaining a reduced hernia within the abdominal cavity.

truss

(trŭs)
n.
Medicine A supportive device, usually a pad with a belt, worn to prevent enlargement of a hernia or the return of a reduced hernia.
tr.v. trussed, trussing, trusses
To support or brace with a truss.

truss

Etymology: Fr, trousser, to pack up
an apparatus worn to prevent or retard the herniation of the intestines or other organ through an opening in the abdominal wall.

truss

(trŭs)
An appliance designed to prevent the return of a reduced hernia or the increase in size of an irreducible hernia; it consists of a pad attached to a belt and kept in place by a spring or straps.
[Fr. trousser, to tie up, to pack]

truss

A belt-like appliance with a pad that exerts pressure over the orifice of a HERNIA so as to prevent protrusion of the bowel. This is an unsatisfactory substitute for surgical repair.
References in periodicals archive ?
Historically, the trusses of many timber covered bridges were designed by "rule-of-thumb.
Photo: Masking fluorescent light mounted between trusses is 51-inch-long sheet-metal skirt
Outdoors, the trusses continue overhead, creating a decorative fan shape and supporting only lightweight shadecloth.
Set it up inside the shed and you'll have a safe, comfortable platform for setting the trusses.
There, two bay panels, approximately 91 feet long, 50 feet wide and 9 feet deep were pre-assembled with the three trusses, intermediate framing and metal deck.
The trusses serve to resist horizontal tensile forces on the nineteenth-century masonry walls that would otherwise be exerted by the weight of the canopy tending to drag the tracks towards the middle of the court.
And the roof is factory-painted steel screwed to heavy-duty trusses that you make yourself.
Permanent bracing of metal-plate-connected trusses is required to stabilize specific members of each truss throughout the life of the roof structure.
All that has been kept of the original warehouse is a brick wall and regimented rows of double bow-string timber trusses.
The upper roof cantilevers off these trusses and the lower roof hangs from them, touching the existing steel columns which are spaced approximately three times as closely as the new ones.