nail plate

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nail

(nāl),
1. One of the thin, horny, translucent plates covering the dorsal surface of the distal end of each terminal phalanx of fingers and toes. A nail consists of corpus or body, the visible part, and radix or root at the proximal end concealed under a fold of skin. The underpart of the nail is formed from the stratum germinativum of the epidermis, the free surface from the stratum lucidum, and the thin cuticular fold overlapping the lunula representing the stratum corneum. Synonym(s): unguis [TA], nail plate, onyx
2. A rod of metal or other solid substance, used in operations to fasten together the fragments of a broken bone.
[A.S. naegel]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

nail

(nāl)
1. One of the thin, horny, translucent plates covering the dorsal surface of the distal end of each terminal phalanx of fingers and toes. A nail consists of a visible corpus or body, and a radix or root at the proximal end concealed under a fold of skin. The under part of the nail is formed from the stratum germinativum of the epidermis, and the free surface from the stratum lucidum, with the thin cuticular fold that overlaps the lunula representing the stratum corneum.
2. A slender rod of metal, bone, or other solid substance, used in operations to fasten together the divided extremities of a broken bone.
Synonym(s): unguis [TA] , nail plate, onyx.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about nail plate

Q. My nails are black- is it dangerous? Hi, I was diagnosed with colon cancer and now I receive chemotherapy. This morning I found that my nails are brown and blue, and other nails have white lines on them. Is that dangerous? Should go and see a doctor?

A. The chemo can cause several changes in your nail, e.g. make them brittle etc. You can find some more info at : http://www.breastcancer.org/tips/hair_skin_nails/nails.jsp

Q. my guy friend has a very sick looking toe nail, what should he do? its really thick and has ridges, its also dark yellow and it looks to me has thick toe jam too... ugh, he needs your help please!

A. It sounds like Toenail fungus. Symptoms of toenail fungus, which can be caused by several types of fungi, include swelling, yellowing, thickening or crumbling of the nail, streaks or spots down the side of the nail, and even complete loss of the nail. Toenail color can vary from brown or yellow to white with this condition. I suggest your friend goes to see a foot doctor. The doctor might remove as much of the nail as possible by trimming, filing or dissolving it. Medicated nail polish might be prescribed for a localized infection, but a serious infection will likely be treated with a prescription oral antifungal medication. Only in severe cases will surgical removal of the nail be recommended.

Q. what natural cure for toe nail fungus really works?

A. Haven't heard about anything natural that was actually provent in reliable, well controlled trial. Especially since natural medications usually aren't tested in this way, I'm not sure there can be an accurate and true answer for this question.

More discussions about nail plate
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References in periodicals archive ?
From this lot, approximately 270 blue-stained and 270 non-stained lumber samples were selected for testing of various mechanical properties, including toughness, bending, and truss plate connector grip capacity in tension.
Only a subset of the total was used for the truss plate grip capacity test.
The modifications were as follows: 1) the relative densities of the blue-stained and non-stained specimens were not controlled since it was not possible to find lodgepole pine wood in the relative density range of 0.31 to 0.38 as specified in the CSA S347-99 standard; 2) the joints were plated so that failure would occur only on the test specimen member by pressing the truss plate with 2 inches more of the truss plate into the dummy member; 3) the displacement transducers were mounted on the test specimen such that only the plate-to-wood slip on this member of the joint could be measured; and 4) for simplicity, the teeth near the end and edges of the member were not ground off.
It suffices to conclude that the blue stain did not have a negative effect on the truss plate connector grip capacity in tension of the wood.
The blue-stained wood showed marginally lower toughness, marginally greater bending MOE, and significantly greater truss plate connector grip capacity in tension compared to the non-stained wood.
Each test assembly consisted of either a 1.2-m blue-stained or non-stained wood test specimen on one side of the joint and a 1.2-m dummy piece of wood of the same cross section on the other side, joined together with a 4.5- by 8-inch (114- by 203-mm) galvanized 16-gauge (1.59-mm thick) truss plates. The truss plates were pressed into the specimen at a pressure of approximately 640 psi (4.4 MPa).
1979 Truss plate testing in Canada: Test procedures and factors affecting strength properties.
Crosstie end plates are similar in appearance to metal connector punched tooth plates (truss plates) used in the wood truss industry.
Groom (1994) subjected wood truss joints to eight moisture cycles from 5 to 19 percent moisture content (MC), and found that truss plates backed out a distance of about 17 percent of the tooth length.
Using lower SG grades to fabricate trusses may result in joints having a more complete embedment of truss plates based on laboratory test joints that used lumber from a wide range of SG.
But, final-fasten the rest top and bottom with small truss plates or by inserting 8d nails one inch from stud's cut end, and angling at about a 45 [degrees] angle into sleeper or plate.
Metal plate connectors (MPC), commonly called "truss plates," are widely used for joining wood members, especially in trussed rafters and joists.