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trunk

 [trungk]
1. the part of the body to which the head and limbs are attached; called also torso.
2. a larger structure, such as a vessel or nerve, from which smaller divisions or branches arise, or that is created by their union. adj., adj trun´cal.
brachiocephalic trunk truncus brachiocephalicus.
celiac trunk the arterial trunk arising from the abdominal aorta and giving origin to the left gastric, common hepatic, and splenic arteries.
encephalic trunk brainstem.
lumbosacral trunk a trunk formed by union of the lower part of ventral branch of the fourth lumbar nerve with the ventral branch of the fifth lumbar nerve.
lymphatic t's the lymphatic vessels (right or left lumbar, intestinal, right or left bronchomediastinal, right or left subclavian, and right or left jugular trunks) that drain lymph from various regions of the body into the right lymphatic or thoracic duct.
pulmonary trunk a vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and bifurcating into the right and left pulmonary arteries.
sympathetic trunk two long ganglionated nerve strands, one on each side of the vertebral column, extending from the base of the skull to the coccyx.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

trunk

(trŭnk), [TA]
1. The body (trunk or torso), excluding the head and extremities.
2. A primary nerve, vessel, or collection of tissue before its division.
3. A large collecting lymphatic vessel.
Synonym(s): truncus [TA]
[L. truncus]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

trunk

(trŭngk)
n.
1. The body of a human excluding the head and limbs.
2. The main stem of a blood vessel or nerve apart from the branches.
3. A large collecting lymphatic vessel.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

trunk

(trŭngk) [TA]
1. The body (trunk or torso), excluding the head and extremities.
2. A primary nerve, vessel, or collection of tissue before its division.
3. A large collecting lymphatic vessel.
Synonym(s): truncus [TA] .
[L. truncus]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

trunk

  1. the main stem of a tree.
  2. the body excluding the head, neck and limbs, i.e. the torso.
  3. the thorax of an insect.
  4. the elongated prehensile proboscis of an elephant.
  5. the main stem of a nerve, blood vessel, etc.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Trunk

That part of the body that does not include the head, arms, and legs.
Mentioned in: Chickenpox
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
"Shall I take your trunk, ma'am?" "Shall I take your baggage?" "Let me 'tend to your baggage, Missis?" "Shan't I carry out these yer, Missis?" rained down upon her unheeded.
And at that last wild yell the whole line flung up their trunks till the tips touched their foreheads, and broke out into the full salute--the crashing trumpet-peal that only the Viceroy of India hears, the Salaamut of the Keddah.
Moti Guj never trampled the life out of Deesa on these occasions, for he knew that after the beating was over, Deesa would embrace his trunk and weep and call him his love and his life and the liver of his soul, and give him some liquor.
"Hold on, now, that's too much!" Bill dropped the trunk to the floor with a bang, straightened up, and thrust his hand into his inside coat pocket.
For an instant Tantor, the elephant, paused with upraised trunk and tail, with great ears up-pricked, and then he swung on along the trail at a rapid, shuffling pace--straight toward the covered pit with its sharpened stakes upstanding in the ground.
Here he remains awhile, eyeing the tree, the very picture of misery; but the next moment, receiving, as it were, a flash of inspiration, he rushes again towards it, and clasping both arms about the trunk, with one elevated a little above the other, he presses the soles of his feet close together against the tree, extending his legs from it until they are nearly horizontal, and his body becomes doubled into an arch; then, hand over hand and foot over foot, he rises from the earth with steady rapidity, and almost before you are aware of it, has gained the cradled and embowered nest of nuts, and with boisterous glee flings the fruit to the ground.
Freed of these encumbrances, he went on to divest himself of his other clothing, which he folded up, piece by piece, and ranged in order on the trunk. Then, he pulled down the window-blinds, drew the curtains, wound up his watch, and, quite leisurely and methodically, got into bed.
Korak ran from the tent just in time to see the enraged elephant's trunk encircle the beast's victim, and then hammock, canopy and man were swung high over Tantor's head.
The elephant halted, lifted his trunk, and resumed his run toward the wood with all his speed; he shook his huge head, and the blood began to gush from his wounds.
I looked down and saw him in the main fork of the tree crouching close against the trunk. Instinctively I crouched down upon the thick limb.
The trunk has been kept in my room for safety; but I shall send it down here now."
Of course I don't know how much red carpet a trunk could buy, but it ought to buy some, anyhow--much as half an aisle, don't you think?