true memory

Memory of an event that actually occurred, which appears to be stored in the left temporoparietal region, which is engaged in encoding auditorily presented words

true memory

Neurology Memory of an event that actually occurred; TMs appear to be stored in the temporal parietal region, where sounds are processed. See Memory. Cf False memory.
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References in classic literature ?
I felt tears come into my eyes at the memory of her laughter, the true memory of the senses almost more penetrating than the reality itself.
When he arrives back in France, Henry makes several shocking discoveries that shake the very foundations of the memories he's had of Elodie all these years and he is left to wonder about the love he has had for Elodie: what rests on true memory vs.
My true memory is being on a coach going somewhere up north I think and we were on the M62 and Richard KD said look at that structure over there, that's going to be the Trafford Centre, we are going to be starting talks soon for it...
On July 5th, as I was leaving Treblinka, one of the six death camps that Nazi Germany built in Poland to murder Europe's Jews, I learned that the man who most seared in the public mind the true memory of that cruelest engine of death had just died.
Regarding true memory, results showed higher rates for participants who watched the non-emotional version (M = 0.75, SD = 0.10) when compared to those who watched the emotional version of the story (M = 0.70, SD = 0.13) [F(1.133) = 6.10, p < 0,05].
The infamous legal defence "faulty memory syndrome" ("it happened so long ago that true memory fails, being replaced by false imagination") was once the dominant and successful court defence used against the victims.
Not sure if it is a true memory or remembered photographs, but I think George was still using a cigarette holder when we met.
For this reason, current research on human memory includes not only true memory analysis but also investigates the mistakes that occur when people try to remember past events.
Although support for this assumption has been found in tasks that measure true memory, less is known about how the structure of lexical knowledge affects emotional false memories.
"Just because you forget where you put your keys or you can't remember why you walked into a room, that's not a reason to panic." But if testing indicates a true memory impairment, it's a warning sign for the individual to make provisions both financially and in terms of caretaking.
If you forget where you put your keys or can't remember why you walked into a room, "that's not a reason to panic." However, "'after you've been clinically evaluated and the clinician feels that you really do have a true memory impairment, then it's a warning sign for both the individual to prepare for the future and for caretakers to be aware that maybe this person might need more care or a plan for care in the future, and to make provisions both financially and in terms of caretaking that might be involved going forward for that individual."
Fellow journalists at the Syndicate also said that "Their work and great devotion created a true memory, a memory distant from the passing and current prejudices, to forever mark the minutes and details of the moment."