true hermaphrodite

true hermaphrodite

n.
An individual having both ovarian and testicular tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
male pseudo-hermaphrodite, female pseudo-hermaphrodite and true hermaphrodite.2 After consensus in 2006, new nomenclature was introduced in which the term Intersex was replaced by Disorder of Sex Development and its main categories were classified as 46, XX DSD; 46, XY DSD; and Sex chromosome DSD.1,2
Sry-negative XX true hermaphrodite in a Basset hound.
O'Neil, "Case report--a true hermaphrodite presenting with hypospadias and an undescended testicle," Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol.
Case report: ultrasonographic appearance of ovotestes in a true hermaphrodite. Clinical radiology 1997;52(4):312-4.
The lawsuit says doctors, acting as agents of defendant hospitals, performed the surgery for the purpose of "assigning" the child the female gender despite their own conclusion that the toddler "was a true hermaphrodite but there was no compelling reason that she should either be made male or female."
Winter's general portrayal of Wayne fits the condition but Wayne is clearly what is often called a "true hermaphrodite." This is an extremely rare condition, in which a person has both male and female reproductive organs.
"Black people in Southern African have an unusually high prevalence of ovotesticular disorders of sex development (DSD), previously called true hermaphrodite and today called intersex," says Dr.
The main difference between these specimens is the simultaneous presence of well developed embryos and hemispermatophores in Maury's specimen, which identifies it as a true hermaphrodite.
Bilateral gonadoblastomas with a left sided dysgerminoma in a true hermaphrodite (disorder of sexual differentiation) with 46, XY karyotype.
Therefore, abnormalities in sex differentiation can occur which may lead to true hermaphrodites, pseudohermaphrodites and gonadal dysgenesis etc5.
SRY gene expression in the ovotestes of XX true hermaphrodites. J Urol 2002;167:1828-31http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0022-5347(05)65242-1.
Individuals possessing both ovarian and testicular tissue (either as one ovary and one testis, or as what is called an ovotestis) were considered true hermaphrodites. Since the nineteenth century hermaphroditism was not only understood as a disorder but referred to a problematic type of person--a connection that would prove important in contemporary debates and in our own thinking.