bug

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Related to true bug: order Hemiptera

bug

(bŭg),
An insect belonging to the suborder Heteroptera. For organisms so called, see the specific term.

bug

(bŭg)
n.
1.
a. An insect having mouthparts used for piercing and sucking, such as an aphid, a bedbug, or a stinkbug.
b. An insect of any kind, such as a cockroach or a ladybug.
c. A small invertebrate with many legs, such as a spider or a centipede.
2.
a. A disease-producing microorganism or agent: a flu bug.
b. The illness or disease so produced: took several days to get over the bug.

bug′ger n.
Computers Any defect in a system, usually understood as a software problem
Drug slang See Coke bug
Entomology Any of a number of insects that suck blood—e.g., bed bugs (Cimex lectularius)—and/or act as vectors for disease—e.g., reduviid bugs, carriers of trypanosomiasis
Informatics A tool used by hackers to access all the cookies from other websites stored on a PC’s hard drive
Microbiology A popular synonym for bacteria

bug

Medical entomology Any of a number of insects that are bloodsucking–eg, bed bugs–Cimex lectularius and/or act as vectors for disease–eg, reduviid bugs, carriers of trypanosomiasis. See Assassin bug, Kissing bug, Red bug, Reduviid bug Microbiology A popular synonym for bacteria. See Superbug.

bug

(bŭg)
1. Any insect of the order Hemiptera.
2. More colloquially, any insect or arachnid.
3. (slang) An acute febrile illness such as influenza or the common cold.
[of uncertain origin]

bug

One of various wingless or four-winged insects of the order Hemiptera and especially of the suborder Heteroptera , with piercing and sucking mouth parts. The bugs of medical importance include the cone nose (Reduviid) ‘assassin’ or ‘kissing’ bugs which transmit CHAGAS' DISEASE, and the bed bug, Cimex lectularis , which cause painful bites.

bug

(bŭg)
1. Any insect of the order Hemiptera.
2. More colloquially, any insect or arachnid.
3. (slang) An acute febrile illness such as influenza or the common cold.
[of uncertain origin]

Patient discussion about bug

Q. i don't like bugs! actually , i afraid of them . is it a phobia? do i need to see someone to discuss it?

A. Phobia or the excess fear of an ordinary object is indeed considered a disorder. However, as many other psychiatric disorders, as long as it doesn’t affect your life adversely and you are capable of functioning well in your daily life you don't HAVE to treat it (unless you want to).

More discussions about bug
References in periodicals archive ?
Schuh and his colleagues are interested in plant-feeding "true bugs." In particular, they are studying the family known as Miridae, or "plant bugs." They are undertaking an enormous project, called the Planetary Biodiversity Inventory (PBI), to create a database of information about 10,000 species of plant bugs.
In the 1980s Toby focused on collecting "true bugs" in the southwest, western U.S., and Mexico.
Given our familiarity with the North American fauna of the Anthocoridae, our lack of success in identifying these 49 specimens probably is an indication that these unidentified species are not part of the true bug fauna in the continental U.S.
Jim Slater, whose handful of lygaeoid collections in the southwest of Western Australia in the 1970s had alerted Toby to the prospect of unknown true bug biodiversity.
Of the 14 insect species belonging to 18 families and 8 orders (Table 1) identified in this study, two species of true bugs stand out; Leptoglossus zonatus (Dallas) (Heteroptera: Coreidae) and Pachycoris klugii Burmeister (Heteroptera: Scutelleridae).
Jim, however, saw the trip home as an opportunity to further the study of culture and improve our knowledge of true bugs. We flew to Rome, via Nairobi and Athens, where we spent three days visiting the main touristic sites.
LIATRUS PYCNOSTACHYA (blazing star) True bugs, wasps
The Smithsonian wants to use the income from Drake's investment, which has grown from around $250,000 to about $4 million, not only to purchase insects but also to buy supplies and to support scientific research on Drake's collection and other ''True Bugs'' it owns.
These insects are the giant water bugs, (or giant electric light bug, Lethocerus americanus) belonging to the order Hemiptera, the "true bugs."
It is a predatory solitary wasp that provisions a subterranean nest with true bugs (i.e., Heteroptera) including the Pentatomidae (i.e., stink bugs) (Bohart & Menke 1976).
As trees grow, they are set upon by true bugs (order Hemiptera) that feed on sap, such as aphids, among many other herbivorous insects.