albino

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albino

 [al-bi´no]
a person affected with albinism.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

al·bi·no

(al-bī'nō),
An individual with albinism.
[Pg., little white one, fr. albo, white, fr. L. albus + -ino, dim. suffix]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

albino

(ăl-bī′nō)
n. pl. albi·nos
An individual with albinism.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

albino

A person with albinism
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

al·bi·no

(al-bī'nō)
An individual with albinism.
[Pg., little white one, fr. albo, white, fr. L. albus + -ino, dim. suffix]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

albino

A person with a genetic defect causing absence of the normal body pigment, MELANIN, which gives colour to the hair, eyes and skin. The gene responsible is recessive and the parents usually have normal colouring. The term derives from the Latin albus , white. See ALBINISM.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Albino

A person or animal lacking normal coloring in the eyes, hair, and skin due to a hereditary inability to produce the skin pigment melanin. The condition itself is called albinism.
Mentioned in: Photosensitivity
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Varying from a true albino, Dustin's deer had the normal black pigmentation on the hooves, gumline, eyes and nosepad.
"The bird sticks out like a sore thumb as it is totally white from top to bottom but it isn't a true albino because it has blue eyes," she said.
Full or true albinos are caused by a genetic mutation that does not allow the animal to produce melanin.
Several photos of so-called albino Porcupines available on the internet appear to be isabelline in coloration, rather than true albinos. Additionally, there may also be present in several museum collections isabelline-colored specimens, where they may be incorrectly labeled as albinistic.