atmosphere

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Related to tropopause: stratosphere

atmosphere

 [at´mos-fēr]
1. the entire gaseous envelope surrounding the earth and subject to the earth's gravitational field.
2. the air or climate in a particular place. adj., atmospher´ic.
3. a unit of pressure, being that exerted by the earth's atmosphere at sea level; equal to 1.01325 × 105pascals (approximately 760 mm Hg). Abbreviated atm.

at·mos·phere

(at'mŏs-fēr),
1. Any gas surrounding a given body; a gaseous medium.
See also: standard atmosphere, torr.
2. A unit of air pressure equal to 101.325 kPa.
See also: standard atmosphere, torr.
[atmo- + G. sphaira, sphere]

atmosphere

/at·mos·phere/ (at´mos-fēr)
1. the entire gaseous envelope surrounding the earth and subject to the earth's gravitational field.
2. the air or climate in a particular place.
3. a unit of pressure, being that exerted by the earth's atmosphere at sea level; equal to 1.01325 × 105pascals (approximately 760 mm Hg). Abbreviated atm.

atmosphere (atm)

[at′məsfir]
Etymology: Gk. atmos, vapor, sphaira, sphere
1 the natural body of air covers the surface of the earth. It is composed of approximately 20% oxygen, 78% nitrogen, and 1% argon and other gases, including small amounts of carbon dioxide hydrogen, and ozone as well as traces of helium, krypton, neon, and xenon and varying amounts of water vapor.
2 an envelope of gas, which may or may not duplicate the natural atmosphere in chemical components.
3 a unit of gas pressure that is usually defined as being equivalent to the average pressure of the earth's atmosphere at sea level, or about 14.7 pounds per square inch or 760 mm Hg. atmospheric, adj.

at·mos·phere

(at'mŏs-fēr)
1. Any gas surrounding a given body; a gaseous medium.
2. A unit of air pressure equal to 101.325 kPa.
See also: standard atmosphere
[atmo- + G. sphaira, sphere]

atmosphere

the gaseous envelope surrounding a particular body such as the earth, or the gaseous content of a given structure or container.

Atmosphere

A measurement of pressure. One atmosphere equals the pressure of air at sea level (14.7 pounds per square inch [psi]).

atmosphere (atm),

n the natural body of air, composed of approximately 20% oxygen, 78% nitrogen, and 2% carbon dioxide and other gases.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ATTREX payload will provide unprecedented measurements of the tropical tropopause," Eric Jensen, ATTREX principal investigator at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California said.
Results indicate that the vertical ozone distributions during these events present a significant ozone reduction from the tropopause to up 20 km ranging from 40 to 70%.
Professor Chandra Wickramasinghe, from Cardiff University, a leading member of the scientific team, said: 'There is now unambiguous evidence for the presence of clumps of living cells in air samples from as high as 41 kilometres, well above the local tropopause, above which no air from lower down would normally be transported.
He suggested that the sound wave originated in Jupiter's tropopause, a region just below the stratosphere and above the visible cloud tops.
The changes in radiative fluxes lead to a cooling of the extratropical lower stratosphere, decreases in static stability, and increases in cloud fraction near the extratropical tropopause.
Near the tropopause, the gravity waves flowing over the mountains often go through a wave-breaking process, similar to waves crashing on a beach, and this generates areas of moderate to extreme turbulence.
Contract Awarded for Formation And Distribution Of Cirrus Clouds In The Tropical Tropopause Layer
The first flights of the Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment (ATTREX), a multi-year airborne science campaign with a heavily instrumented Global Hawk aircraft, will take off from and be operated by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California.
Since net upward motion across the tropopause takes place in the tropics, some of the biomass burning effluents may even reach into the stratosphere [18].
Water vapor distributes itself naturally over the whole atmosphere," Bertaux explains, "except if there is some cold temperature trap at some altitude--like Earth's tropopause.
52 at the tropopause, or more than two and one-half times the speed of sound.
The extra weight is needed for the balloon to safely ascend through the tropopause (between 40,000 and 50,000ft).