tropism


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Related to tropism: viral tropism

tropism

 [tro´pizm]
a growth response in a nonmotile organism elicited by an external stimulus, and either toward the stimulus (positive tropism) or away from it (negative tropism); used as a word element combined with a stem that indicates the nature of the stimulus (e.g., phototropism) or the material or entity for which an organism or substance shows a special affinity (e.g., neurotropism). See also taxis.

tro·pism

, positive tropismnegative tropism (trō'pizm),
The phenomenon, observed in living organisms, of moving toward (positive tropism) or away from (negative tropism) a focus of light, heat, or other stimulus; usually applied to the movement of a portion of the organism as opposed to taxis, the movement of an entire organism.
[G. tropē, a turning]

tropism

/tro·pism/ (tro´pizm) the turning, bending, movement, or growth of an organism or part of an organism elicited by an external stimulus, either toward (positive t.) or away from (negative t.) the stimulus; used as a word element combined with a stem indicating the nature of the stimulus (e.g., phototropism) or material or entity for which an organism (or substance) shows a special affinity (e.g., neurotropism). Usually applied to nonmotile organisms.

tropism

(trō′pĭz′əm)
n.
The turning or bending movement of an organism or a part of an organism in a particular direction in response to an external stimulus such as light or gravity.

tro′pic, tro·pis′tic adj.
tro·pis′ti·cal·ly adv.

tro·pism

(trō'pizm)
The phenomenon, observed in living organisms, of moving toward (positive tropism) or away from (negaive tropism) a focus of light, heat, or other stimulus; usually applied to the movement of a portion of the organism as opposed to taxis, the movement of an entire organism.
[G. tropē, a turning]

tropism

An automatic movement made by an organism towards or away from a source of stimulation.

tropism

a bending growth movement in a plant either away from or towards a directional stimulus. Tropic movements are brought about by unequal growth on the two sides of an organ (such as the stem) brought about by unequal distributions of AUXIN. See PHOTOTROPISM, GEOTROPISM, THIGMOTROPISM, CHEMOTROPISM.

tropism

a growth response in a nonmotile organism elicited by an external stimulus, and either toward (positive tropism) or away from (negative tropism) the stimulus; used as a word element combined with a stem indicating nature of the stimulus (e.g. phototropism) or material or entity for which an organism (or substance) shows a special affinity (e.g. neurotropism).
References in periodicals archive ?
Different species appear to have significant differences in site tropism and host fidelity (including zoonotic potential), and it can reasonably be extrapolated that significant differences in pathogenicity are likely.
Genetic evolution and tropism of transmissible gastroenteritis coronaviruses.
Monogram Biosciences provided resistance and tropism testing.
Specific tests with special indications such as a viral tropism assay should be used prior to beginning a CCR5-cell surface receptor antagonist drug, while Human Leukocyte Allele-B * 5702 gene testing should be done prior to starting the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug Abacavir.
Replication in sheep lung is required for the virus to change its cell tropism for the next stage--infecting lymphocytes, a type of immune cell.
The major problem with maraviroc is the necessity for tropism testing.
Tropism and toxicity of adeno-associated viral vector serotypes 1,2,5,6,7,8,9 in rat neurons and glia in vitro.
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has a strong tropism for lymphoid tissues, particularly CD4+ T lymphocytes, monocytes, and dendritic cells.
Pre-screening patients for viral tropism is therefore a necessary but cumbersome step in initiating this drug.
The virus is highly species-specific and shows tropism for specific cell types.
However, AAV, similar to adenovirus, has a broad tissue tropism because it also uses integrins in addition to heparin sulfate proteoglycans (as a primary receptor), and fibroblast growth factor 1 (as a coreceptor) for infection.