tropical oil


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tropical oil

Nutrition
Any of a family of cooking oils obtained from palm and coconut trees, which differ from other vegetable oils in that, like animal fats, they have a high content of saturated fat, and thus are thought to have significant atherogenic potential.

tropical oil

Nutrition A cooking oil from palm and coconut trees, which differs from other vegetable oils in that, like animal fats, it is high in saturated fatty acids, and thus may have atherogenic potential. See Cis fatty acids, Fish oil, Olive oil, Transfatty acids.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Hamburg investment complements Cargill's ongoing expansions of its tropical oil refineries.
Remarks made by a Kellogg vice president and Sokolof on USA Today placed Sokolof at the center of the tropical oil controversy:
Archer Daniels Midland Company (NYSE: ADM) and Wilmar International Limited (SGX: WIL) today announced the signing of a memorandum of understanding, indicating their intent to work together in a strategic partnership in global fertilizer purchasing and distribution, global ocean freight operations, and tropical oils refining in Europe.
TABLE 47 TROPICAL OILS PRODUCTION, THROUGH 2012 (MILLION METRIC TONNES) 131
But beware of the use of tropical oils, such as palm (50 percent saturated fat) and coconut (90 percent saturated fat).
The next best thing to floating in the Dead Sea, bath salts boast of nourishing tropical oils and seawead extracts that soothe.
Tropical Oils and Butters are blended to provide a safe, clean, and healthy bathing experience.
Cost is still the biggest barrier to implementation, and demand isn't yet high enough for Cargill's four palm oil refineries to produce the product at full capacity, according to Mohit Gupta, tropical oils product line manager.
A small daily dose of minimally processed tropical oils is likely to benefit those of us living in temperate climates, too, especially for maintaining muscle and curbing appetite.
Their attack is reminiscent of a Poisoning of America newspaper advertising campaign initiated in 1990 by a wealthy Omaha businessman named Phil Sokolof who blamed tropical oils used in snacks and beef tallow used for McDonald's fries for his own heart attack.
Before the 1990's, public health recommendations to use fewer animal fats and tropical oils spurred food producers to partially hydrogenate fats--a process that introduces trans fatty acids (or trans fats) into fats of vegetable origin: Multiple research studies conducted throughout the 1990's show that partial hydrogenation and resulting trans fatty acids raise serum cholesterol levels.
Saturated fats, which are found in meat, poultry, fish, baked goods and tropical oils, increase risk of heart disease.

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