trisaccharide


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Related to trisaccharide: tetrasaccharide

trisaccharide

 [tri-sak´ah-rīd]
a sugar, each molecule of which yields three molecules of monosaccharides on hydrolysis.

tri·sac·cha·ride

(trī-sak'ă-rīd),
A carbohydrate containing three monosaccharide residues, for example, raffinose.

trisaccharide

(trī-săk′ə-rīd′, -rĭd)
n.
A carbohydrate that yields three monosaccharides upon hydrolysis.

trisaccharide

[trīsak′ərīd]
Etymology: Gk, treis, three, sakcharon, sugar
a carbohydrate composed of three monosaccharide units linked together.

trisaccharide

an OLIGOSACCHARIDE whose molecules have three linked MONOSACCHARIDE molecules.

trisaccharide

a sugar each molecule of which yields three molecules of monosaccharides on hydrolysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
As indicated by the arrow, the trisaccharide form is not detected in homozygous Gc2 individuals, consistent with the Gc2 genotype lacking the preferred site of O-linked glycosylation ([Thr.
have identified this trisaccharide in concentrated urine fractions of affected patients (7).
The purified hemoglobin reacts with o-raffinose, a polyaldehyde obtained through oxidation of the trisaccharide raffinose [10, 11].
The activity was inhibited to a lesser degree by disaccharides and trisaccharides like lactose, melibiose and raffinose, all of which are saccharides with a terminal non-reducing galactose (Table 1).
Kaden Biochemicals7rare sugar lines include monosaccharides, disaccharides and trisaccharides such as rhamnose, arabinose and galactose.
Kaden Biochemicals' rare sugar lines include monosaccharides, disaccharides and trisaccharides such as rhamnose, arabinose, and galactose.
The A and B trisaccharides are thought to act as receptors for rosetting on uninfected erythrocytes and direct binding between the parasite rosetting ligand PfEMP1 and the A antigen has been demonstrated.
Higher levels of monosaccharides, disaccharides and trisaccharides are present in the mature green maize [20].
They include monosaccharides (glucose, fructose, xylose or mannose), disaccharides (sucrose, lactose and maltose), trisaccharides, oligosaccharides and polysaccharides.