three-vessel disease

(redirected from triple-vessel disease)

three-vessel disease

Coronary heart disease in which three coronary arteries have significant narrowing/stenosis. Three-vessel diseases are more commonly managed by bypass than by stenting or angioplasty.
References in periodicals archive ?
Background: Patients with premature triple-vessel disease (PTVD) have a higher risk of recurrent coronary events and repeat revascularization; however, the long-term outcome of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and medical therapy (MT) alone for PTVD patients is controversial.
Based on disease severity, obstructive CAD is classified as single, double-, or triple-vessel disease.
The current guidelines give a class I recommendation to revascularization before noncardiac surgery in patients with left main or triple-vessel disease, as well as two-vessel disease that includes the left anterior descending coronary artery.
Interventional cardiologists gathered for the demonstration watched Arif Al Nooryani, MD, perform the triple-vessel disease case robotically in real-time by deploying bioresorbable stents, wiring the lesion and placing the stents using the CorPath System.
Using coronary angiography, the study population was divided into subjects without any angiographically detectable CAD or with coronary arterial stenoses less than 50% (no vessel disease; n=ioo) and individuals with single-vessel disease (n=72), double-vessel disease (n=75) or triple-vessel disease (n=63) (Table 1).
These include patients with left main or triple-vessel disease and a SYNTAX score below 22.
Coronary arteriography revealed triple-vessel disease with a chronic proximal occlusion of the right coronary artery and a subtotal occlusion by thrombus of the mid portion of the left anterior descending coronary artery, which was stented.
A coronary angiogram showed severe worsening triple-vessel disease.
The greater the extent and severity of CAD, the greater the incidence of UMI: In patients with triple-vessel disease, 53 percent showed evidence of non-Q-wave UMI and 15 percent had Q-wave UMI--making non-Q-wave UMI three times more common.
5% of smokers had triple-vessel disease, compared with 21.
Exclusion criteria included left-main disease, triple-vessel disease, unstable angina, or myocardial infarction within the previous 2 weeks, or an ejection fraction [is less than] 40%.
Using coronary angiography, 15 (22%) AMI patients had single-vessel disease, 29 (42%) had double-vessel disease, and 25 (36%) had triple-vessel disease.