triple bond


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tri·ple bond

a covalent bond resulting from the sharing of three pairs of electrons, for example, HCΞCH (acetylene).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tri·ple bond

(trip'ĕl bond)
A covalent bond resulting from the sharing of three pairs of electrons.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
It produces enough energy that it breaks that triple bond in our atmospheric nitrogen gas, to produce nitrogenous oxides that can then rain down into water bodies," Ranjan said.
About 78 percent of the Earth's atmosphere is nitrogen, in the form of two nitrogen atoms linked by a triple bond. Various soil microbes can "fix" atmospheric nitrogen, separating the twin atoms to make them available to bond with other molecules, such as carbon.
He needed to use temperatures of 932[degrees] to 1,832[degrees]F (500[degrees] to 1,000[degrees]C) and pressures 100 to 250 times atmospheric pressure to break the triple bond.
The carbon-carbon triple bond FTIR band was greatly diminished following a 15 minute hold at 37500, indicating reaction was near completion and/or the remaining concentration of triple bonds was below the instrument's detection limit.
Despite many interesting and useful reactions of acetylenes with superbases the most amazing is the "contrathermodynamic" multipositional isomerization of the internal triple bond to the terminal position under the influence of alkali metal amides of ethylenediamine or 1,3-propylenediamine.
The reason might lie on the fruitful p-electrons of N, O and triple bond, which can form covalent bonds between the molecules and the ion surface, capture H to release the acidity and even join the isatin Schiff base molecules as "bridges" to conform the protective film on the ion surface.
By activating the compound hafnocene (a complex of hafnium metal ions with cyclopentadiene and chlorine ligands) to react with [N.sub.2] by switching the chlorine for iodine, the [N.sub.2] becomes complexed between two hafnocenes, effectively reducing the triple bond to a single bond.
The variant is also the first to replace the bond holding each letter to the helix-shaped backbone with a more rigid triple bond. This new bond is what gives the unnatural DNA its greater stability and resistance to enzymes.
Nitrogen wafts around in the air as paired atoms ([N.sub.2]) locked together chemically with a robust triple bond. Despite a great need for the element, the bodies of living things complex enough to have cells with a nucleus--paramecia and potatoes and people alike--have no natural way to break that bond.