trill


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

trill

Etymology: It, trillare, to make a ringing sound
a vibratory, quavering, warbling sound, as produced by human voice, birds, insects, or musical instruments.

trill

(trĭl) [It. trillare, probably imitative]
A tremulous sound, esp. in vocal music.
References in periodicals archive ?
Trill looked as if she was starting to check out the house.
When asked about Hill's turning into a celebrity overnight, offensive coordinator Jake Spavital answered: ''Kenny Trill, you mean?
The court heard Trill and the chairman of the organisation, John Beynon, were joint signatories for cheques written on behalf of the chamber.
This article thoroughly describes the phonetic realization and distribution of Costa Rican rhotics (the Standard trill as well as the tap).
or trill [R]) on the grounds that Old English front-vowel diphthongisation (breaking) is explicable as a coarticulatory effect caused by members of the natural class of back consonants.
Magistrates declined jurisdiction and adjourned the case until November 19, when Trill will be committed to Newcastle Crown Court.
In earlier days the "tongue-tip-r," that is, the apical trill [r], was the typical pronunciation of the /r/ in German, and also in neighboring countries.
Back in our universe, song sparrows do spar musically, although with chirps and trills rather than words.
Mr Trill said yesterday: ``Clearly the shape of Swiss Life (UK) will undergo considerable changes during the coming months and to accommodate this we need to reconsider management and staffing structures.
Noting that contemporaries including Donne and Jonson seemed genuinely to admire Mary Sidney's translation of the Psalms while modern feminists dismiss them as derivative translations and find dispiriting their lack of opposition to patriarchy, Suzanne Trill voices what I think is an important concern: that "in seeking 'oppositional' writing, we distort the picture of women's literary history and run the risk of marginalising significant literary texts by women" (198).