trihybrid


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tri·hy·brid

(trī-hī'brid),
The offspring of parents that differ in three mendelian characters.
[tri- + L. hybrida, hybrid]

trihybrid

(trī-hī′brĭd)
n.
The hybrid of parents that differ at only three gene loci, for which each parent is homozygous.

trihybrid

[trīhī′brid]
Etymology: Gk, treis + hybrida, mixed offspring
pertaining to an individual, organism, or strain that is heterozygous for three specific traits; the offspring of parents differing in three specific gene pairs or that is heterozygous for three particular traits or gene loci being followed.

trihybrid

(trī-hī′brĭd) [Gr. treis, three, + L. hybrida, mongrel]
In genetics, the offspring of a cross between two individuals differing in three unit characters.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As complicated as this dihybrid cross was, imagine such a cross with characters displaying incomplete dominance or a trihybrid cross (three nonlinked traits).
Virgin females (designated by a Venus symbol combined with a "V") may be either dihybrid (A or B) or trihybrid (C or D).
Four possible exercises are presented: two dihybrid testcrosses (Figure 2A,B) and two trihybrid testcrosses (Figure 2 C,D).
Note that the dihybrid exercises are identical to their trihybrid counterparts except for the omission of the [y.
Both loci were present on an alien chromosome, which had been introduced into a trihybrid with pearl millet background (Dujardin and Hanna, 1989; Hanna et al.
Furthermore, in the Iblean region the clonal trihybrid parthenogen B.
The trihybrid genome constitution of Bacillus lynceorum (Insecta Phasmatodea) and its karyotypic variations.
Although I describe our specific class example in which we use this method with the F2 data from a dihybrid Drosophila cross, this method could easily be adjusted for analysis of a Drosophila trihybrid cross as well, mapping each pair of genes individually (Brooker, 2005).
While Punnett squares are a useful device for determining the outcome of genetic crosses, they can become cumbersome for dihybrid or trihybrid crosses.
This process has delineated a Costa Rican population with a main trihybrid ancestry, resulting from the cumulative admixture of genes of European (61%), Amerindian (30%) and African (9%) origin (Morera et al.
Trihybrids related to the unisexual molly fish, Poecilia formosa.